metamorphosis

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met·a·mor·pho·sis

 (mĕt′ə-môr′fə-sĭs)
n. pl. met·a·mor·pho·ses (-sēz′)
1. A transformation, as by magic or sorcery.
2. A marked change in appearance, character, condition, or function.
3. Biology Change in the form and often habits of an animal during normal development after the embryonic stage. Metamorphosis includes, in insects, the transformation of a maggot into an adult fly and a caterpillar into a butterfly and, in amphibians, the changing of a tadpole into a frog.
4. A usually degenerative change in the structure of a particular body tissue.

[Latin metamorphōsis, from Greek, from metamorphoun, to transform : meta-, meta- + morphē, form.]

metamorphosis

(ˌmɛtəˈmɔːfəsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-ˌsiːz)
1. a complete change of physical form or substance
2. a complete change of character, appearance, etc
3. a person or thing that has undergone metamorphosis
4. (Zoology) zoology the rapid transformation of a larva into an adult that occurs in certain animals, for example the stage between tadpole and frog or between chrysalis and butterfly
[C16: via Latin from Greek: transformation, from meta- + morphē form]

met•a•mor•pho•sis

(ˌmɛt əˈmɔr fə sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-ˌsiz)
1. a profound change in form from stage to the next in the life history of an organism, as from the pupa to the adult butterfly.
2. a complete change of form, structure, or substance, as transformation by magic.
3. any complete change in appearance, character, circumstances, etc.
4.
a. a type of alteration or degeneration in which tissues are changed.
b. the resultant form.
[1525–35; < New Latin < Greek metamórphōsis transformation. See meta-, -morph, -osis]
click for a larger image
metamorphosis
development of a monarch butterfly from egg to larva (caterpillar) to pupa (cocoon) to imago (adult)

met·a·mor·pho·sis

(mĕt′ə-môr′fə-sĭs)
Dramatic change in the form and often the habits of an animal during its development after birth or hatching. The transformation of a maggot into an adult fly, and of a tadpole into an adult frog, are examples of metamorphosis. The young of such animals are called larvae.

metamorphosis

1. change in form, structure, appearance, etc.
2. magical transformation. — metamorphic, metamorphous, adj.
See also: Change, Magic
a change or succession of changes in form during the life cycle of an animal, allowing it to adapt to different environmental conditions, as a caterpillar into a butterfly.
See also: Zoology

metamorphosis

Change in the form of certain organisms between the juvenile and adult stages, e.g. tadpole and frog.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metamorphosis - the marked and rapid transformation of a larva into an adult that occurs in some animalsmetamorphosis - the marked and rapid transformation of a larva into an adult that occurs in some animals
hemimetabolism, hemimetaboly, hemimetamorphosis - incomplete or partial metamorphosis in insects
heterometabolism, heterometaboly - development of insects with incomplete metamorphosis in which no pupal stage precedes maturity
holometabolism, holometaboly - complete metamorphosis in insects
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
2.metamorphosis - a striking change in appearance or character or circumstances; "the metamorphosis of the old house into something new and exciting"
revision, alteration - the act of revising or altering (involving reconsideration and modification); "it would require a drastic revision of his opinion"
3.metamorphosis - a complete change of physical form or substance especially as by magic or witchcraftmetamorphosis - a complete change of physical form or substance especially as by magic or witchcraft
translation, transformation - the act of changing in form or shape or appearance; "a photograph is a translation of a scene onto a two-dimensional surface"

metamorphosis

metamorphosis

noun
The process or result of changing from one appearance, state, or phase to another:
Translations
تَحَوُّل، مَسْخ
proměna
forvandling
muodonmuutos
metamorfoza
metamorfózis
umbreyting; hamskipti
metamorfozė
metamorfoze
başkalaşımmetamorfoz

metamorphosis

[ˌmetəˈmɔːfəsɪs] N (metamorphoses (pl)) [ˌmetəˈmɔːfəsiːz]metamorfosis f inv

metamorphosis

[ˌmɛtəˈmɔːrfəsɪs] [metamorphoses] [ˌmɛtəˈmɔːrfəsiːs] (pl) nmétamorphose f

metamorphosis

n pl <metamorphoses> → Metamorphose f; (fig)Verwandlung f

metamorphosis

[ˌmɛtəˈmɔːfəsɪs] n (metamorphoses (pl)) [ˌmɛtəˈmɔːfəsiːz]metamorfosi f inv

metamorphosis

(metəˈmoːfəsis) plural ˌmetaˈmorphoses (-siːz) noun
(a) marked change of form, appearance, character etc. a caterpillar's metamorphosis into a butterfly.

met·a·mor·pho·sis

n. metamorfosis.
1. cambio de forma o estructura;
2. cambio degenerativo patológico.
References in classic literature ?
Three metamorphoses of the spirit do I designate to you: how the spirit becometh a camel, the camel a lion, and the lion at last a child.
Three metamorphoses of the spirit have I designated to you: how the spirit became a camel, the camel a lion, and the lion at last a child.
The buildings alone, which were hidden there, had preserved traces of their strange metamorphoses.
My visitor, who had watched these metamorphoses with a keen eye, smiled, set down the glass upon the table, and then turned and looked upon me with an air of scrutiny.
Attempts so extravagant as these to disfigure or, it might rather be said, to metamorphose the object, render it necessary to take an accurate view of its real nature and form: in order as well to ascertain its true aspect and genuine appearance, as to unmask the disingenuity and expose the fallacy of the counterfeit resemblances which have been so insidiously, as well as industriously, propagated.
That unless Monsieur de Beaufort can contrive to metamorphose himself into a little bird, I will continue answerable for him.
Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and Its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid's Metamorphoses
The reference is to the first book of Ovid's Metamorphoses, where, in a world destroyed by the Flood, Deucalion and his wife Pyrrha create a new race of men.
Synopsis: In the pages of "The Metamorphoses of Fat: A History of Obesity", Georges Vigarello (Research Director at the Ecole des Hautes Erudes en Sciences Sociales) maps the evolution of Western ideas about fat and fat people from the Middle Ages to the present, paying particular attention to the role of science, fashion, fitness crazes, and public health campaigns in shaping these views.
The National's Aaron Dessner commented: "We are very excited to explore the creative possibilities of the Metamorphoses project, setting the words of others to music and bringing communities together to fight poverty.
The aim of his analysis, as stated in the introduction, is broad and ambitious, namely 'to show how the Metamorphoses works as a piece of literature, to explore its poetics, as well as the ways in which questions of production and reception are reflected in the text' (v).
The Metamorphoses of Kinship" discusses the evolution of friendship, romance, and family has rapidly changed in past decades and what this had done to society.