metamorphosis


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

met·a·mor·pho·sis

 (mĕt′ə-môr′fə-sĭs)
n. pl. met·a·mor·pho·ses (-sēz′)
1. A transformation, as by magic or sorcery.
2. A marked change in appearance, character, condition, or function.
3. Biology Change in the form and often habits of an animal during normal development after the embryonic stage. Metamorphosis includes, in insects, the transformation of a maggot into an adult fly and a caterpillar into a butterfly and, in amphibians, the changing of a tadpole into a frog.
4. A usually degenerative change in the structure of a particular body tissue.

[Latin metamorphōsis, from Greek, from metamorphoun, to transform : meta-, meta- + morphē, form.]

metamorphosis

(ˌmɛtəˈmɔːfəsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-ˌsiːz)
1. a complete change of physical form or substance
2. a complete change of character, appearance, etc
3. a person or thing that has undergone metamorphosis
4. (Zoology) zoology the rapid transformation of a larva into an adult that occurs in certain animals, for example the stage between tadpole and frog or between chrysalis and butterfly
[C16: via Latin from Greek: transformation, from meta- + morphē form]

met•a•mor•pho•sis

(ˌmɛt əˈmɔr fə sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-ˌsiz)
1. a profound change in form from stage to the next in the life history of an organism, as from the pupa to the adult butterfly.
2. a complete change of form, structure, or substance, as transformation by magic.
3. any complete change in appearance, character, circumstances, etc.
4.
a. a type of alteration or degeneration in which tissues are changed.
b. the resultant form.
[1525–35; < New Latin < Greek metamórphōsis transformation. See meta-, -morph, -osis]
click for a larger image
metamorphosis
development of a monarch butterfly from egg to larva (caterpillar) to pupa (cocoon) to imago (adult)

met·a·mor·pho·sis

(mĕt′ə-môr′fə-sĭs)
Dramatic change in the form and often the habits of an animal during its development after birth or hatching. The transformation of a maggot into an adult fly, and of a tadpole into an adult frog, are examples of metamorphosis. The young of such animals are called larvae.

metamorphosis

1. change in form, structure, appearance, etc.
2. magical transformation. — metamorphic, metamorphous, adj.
See also: Change, Magic
a change or succession of changes in form during the life cycle of an animal, allowing it to adapt to different environmental conditions, as a caterpillar into a butterfly.
See also: Zoology

metamorphosis

Change in the form of certain organisms between the juvenile and adult stages, e.g. tadpole and frog.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metamorphosis - the marked and rapid transformation of a larva into an adult that occurs in some animalsmetamorphosis - the marked and rapid transformation of a larva into an adult that occurs in some animals
hemimetabolism, hemimetaboly, hemimetamorphosis - incomplete or partial metamorphosis in insects
heterometabolism, heterometaboly - development of insects with incomplete metamorphosis in which no pupal stage precedes maturity
holometabolism, holometaboly - complete metamorphosis in insects
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
2.metamorphosis - a striking change in appearance or character or circumstances; "the metamorphosis of the old house into something new and exciting"
revision, alteration - the act of revising or altering (involving reconsideration and modification); "it would require a drastic revision of his opinion"
3.metamorphosis - a complete change of physical form or substance especially as by magic or witchcraftmetamorphosis - a complete change of physical form or substance especially as by magic or witchcraft
translation, transformation - the act of changing in form or shape or appearance; "a photograph is a translation of a scene onto a two-dimensional surface"

metamorphosis

metamorphosis

noun
The process or result of changing from one appearance, state, or phase to another:
Translations
تَحَوُّل، مَسْخ
proměna
forvandling
muodonmuutos
metamorfoza
metamorfózis
umbreyting; hamskipti
metamorfozė
metamorfoze
başkalaşımmetamorfoz

metamorphosis

[ˌmetəˈmɔːfəsɪs] N (metamorphoses (pl)) [ˌmetəˈmɔːfəsiːz]metamorfosis f inv

metamorphosis

[ˌmɛtəˈmɔːrfəsɪs] [metamorphoses] [ˌmɛtəˈmɔːrfəsiːs] (pl) nmétamorphose f

metamorphosis

n pl <metamorphoses> → Metamorphose f; (fig)Verwandlung f

metamorphosis

[ˌmɛtəˈmɔːfəsɪs] n (metamorphoses (pl)) [ˌmɛtəˈmɔːfəsiːz]metamorfosi f inv

metamorphosis

(metəˈmoːfəsis) plural ˌmetaˈmorphoses (-siːz) noun
(a) marked change of form, appearance, character etc. a caterpillar's metamorphosis into a butterfly.

met·a·mor·pho·sis

n. metamorfosis.
1. cambio de forma o estructura;
2. cambio degenerativo patológico.
References in classic literature ?
But while opinion concerning him had remained nearly stationary, and his daily habits had presented scarcely any visible change, Marner's inward life had been a history and a metamorphosis, as that of every fervid nature must be when it has fled, or been condemned, to solitude.
You were engaged with a couple of wine-skins, and not a giant," said the landlord at this; but Don Fernando told him to hold his tongue and on no account interrupt Don Quixote, who continued, "I say in conclusion, high and disinherited lady, that if your father has brought about this metamorphosis in your person for the reason I have mentioned, you ought not to attach any importance to it; for there is no peril on earth through which my sword will not force a way, and with it, before many days are over, I will bring your enemy's head to the ground and place on yours the crown of your kingdom.
The transition had been so sudden and so unexpected that it left me for a moment forgetful of aught else than my strange metamorphosis.
Remorse for a scurvy act, and an honorable desire to right the wrong he had done the woman he now knew he really loved had excited these germs to rapid growth in Morison Baynes--and the metamorphosis had taken place.
He said that was so, and proceeded to point out that the possibility of vivisection does not stop at a mere physical metamorphosis.
His next care on leaving the barber's who had achieved his first metamorphosis was to enter a shop and buy a complete sailor's suit -- a garb, as we all know, very simple, and consisting of white trousers, a striped shirt, and a cap.
Under these disadvantages, the old loyalist's story required more revision to render it fit for the public eye than those of the series which have preceded it; nor should it be concealed that the sentiment and tone of the affair may have undergone some slight, or perchance more than slight, metamorphosis, in its transmission to the reader through the medium of a thorough-going democrat.
A few hours in a populous town, however, produced a magical metamorphosis.
David raised the lids and shook his head, while Jacob put his finger in and took out a guinea to taste whether the metamorphosis into lozenges was complete and satisfactory.
Totty, however, had descended from her chair with great swiftness, and was already in retreat towards the dairy with a sort of waddling run, and an amount of fat on the nape of her neck which made her look like the metamorphosis of a white suckling pig.
His father's looks of solemnity and amazement on this his first appearance on any stage, and the gradual metamorphosis of the impassioned Baron Wildenheim into the well-bred and easy Mr.
What we call nature is a certain self-regulated motion or change; and nature does all things by her own hands, and does not leave another to baptize her but baptizes herself; and this through the metamorphosis again.