metaphor


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Related to metaphor: simile

met·a·phor

 (mĕt′ə-fôr′, -fər)
n.
1. A figure of speech in which a word or phrase that ordinarily designates one thing is used to designate another, thus making an implicit comparison, as in "a sea of troubles" or "All the world's a stage" (Shakespeare).
2. One thing conceived as representing another; a symbol: "Hollywood has always been an irresistible, prefabricated metaphor for the crass, the materialistic, the shallow, and the craven" (Neal Gabler).

[Middle English methaphor, from Old French metaphore, from Latin metaphora, from Greek, transference, metaphor, from metapherein, to transfer : meta-, meta- + pherein, to carry; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

met′a·phor′ic (-fôr′ĭk), met′a·phor′i·cal adj.
met′a·phor′i·cal·ly adv.

metaphor

(ˈmɛtəfə; -ˌfɔː)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action that it does not literally denote in order to imply a resemblance, for example he is a lion in battle. Compare simile
[C16: from Latin, from Greek metaphora, from metapherein to transfer, from meta- + pherein to bear]
metaphoric, ˌmetaˈphorical adj
ˌmetaˈphorically adv
ˌmetaˈphoricalness n

met•a•phor

(ˈmɛt əˌfɔr, -fər)

n.
1. the application of a word or phrase to an object or concept it does not literally denote, suggesting comparison to that object or concept, as in "A mighty fortress is our God."
2. something used or regarded as being used to represent something else; symbol: the novel's use of the city as a metaphor for isolation.
[1525–35; < Latin < Greek metaphorá a transfer, n. derivative of metaphérein to transfer. See meta-, -phore]
met`a•phor′i•cal (-ˈfɔr ɪ kəl, -ˈfɒr-) met`a•phor′ic, adj.
met`a•phor′i•cal•ly, adv.

metaphor

  • trope - A figurative or metaphorical use of a word or phrase.
  • ingrain, ingrained - Ingrain literally means "work into the grain" (originally, of fabric), and ingrained is metaphorically "deep-seated."
  • farce - First meant forcemeat stuffing and came to be used metaphorically when a humorous play was "stuffed" in between two more serious acts of the main theatrical presentation—or for interludes of impromptu buffoonery in a dramatic presentation.
  • relieve - Metaphorically, to "alleviate, lighten," from Latin relevare, "raise again."

metaphor

1. A comparison of one person or thing with another by saying that the first is the second, as in “He was a tiger in combat.”
2. Use of an object or action to represent another. Mixed metaphor is the joining together of unmatched metaphors with ridiculous results.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metaphor - a figure of speech in which an expression is used to refer to something that it does not literally denote in order to suggest a similaritymetaphor - a figure of speech in which an expression is used to refer to something that it does not literally denote in order to suggest a similarity
figure of speech, trope, image, figure - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
dead metaphor, frozen metaphor - a metaphor that has occurred so often that it has become a new meaning of the expression (e.g., `he is a snake' may once have been a metaphor but after years of use it has died and become a new sense of the word `snake')
mixed metaphor - a combination of two or more metaphors that together produce a ridiculous effect
synesthetic metaphor - a metaphor that exploits a similarity between experiences in different sense modalities

metaphor

noun figure of speech, image, symbol, analogy, emblem, conceit (literary), allegory, trope, figurative expression the writer's use of metaphor
Translations
إسْتِعارَه، مَجازمجاز
metafora
metafor
metafora
metafora
metafora
myndhvörf
ひゆ比喩
metafora
metafora
metafora
metafor
benzetmemecazmetafor

metaphor

[ˈmetəfɔːʳ] Nmetáfora f
see also mixed B

metaphor

[ˈmɛtəfɔːr] nmétaphore f
a metaphor for sth → une métaphore pour qch
... to mix my metaphors ... → ... si j'ose cette métaphore ...

metaphor

nMetapher f; to mix one’s metaphorsunterschiedliche Metaphern zusammen verwenden

metaphor

[ˈmɛtəfəʳ] nmetafora

metaphor

(ˈmetəfə) noun
a form of expression (not using `like' or `as')in which a quality or characteristic is given to a person or thing by using a name, image, adjective etc normally used of something else which has similar qualities etc. `He's a tiger when he's angry' is an example of (a) metaphor.
ˌmetaˈphoric(al) (-ˈfo-) adjective
of, like or using metaphors. metaphorical language.
ˌmetaˈphorically adverb
References in classic literature ?
They were handsome girls, had the fresh colour of their country upbringing, and in their eyes that brilliancy which is called-- by no metaphor, alas
Keeping up the metaphor of the political guillotine, the whole may be considered as the POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF A DECAPITATED SURVEYOR: and the sketch which I am now bringing to a close, if too autobiographical for a modest person to publish in his lifetime, will readily be excused in a gentleman who writes from beyond the grave.
And no mere commonplace language, either, but rattling, out-and-out book-talk--and bristling with metaphor, too--just bristling
Every line, every word was--in the hackneyed metaphor which their dear writer, were she here, would forbid--a dagger to my heart.
The first step toward accomplishing that object is to beat our retreat -- excuse a professional metaphor from a military man -- to beat our retreat from York to-morrow.
When I say petticoat, I use the word in its literal sense, not colloquially as a metaphor for its usual wearer, meaning thereby a dainty feminine undergarment seen only by men on rainy days, and one might add washing-days.
Quincey's head is level at times, but most so when there is to hunt, metaphor be more dishonor to science than wolves be of danger to man.
Sometimes too we qualify the metaphor by adding the term to which the proper word is relative.
A few men, the least impressed of all by the scene, pronounced a discourse, some deploring this premature death, others expatiating on the grief of the father, and one very ingenious person quoting the fact that Valentine had solicited pardon of her father for criminals on whom the arm of justice was ready to fall -- until at length they exhausted their stores of metaphor and mournful speeches.
In that same house ANOTHER person--a person of great wealth-may also have been dreaming of shoes; but, of shoes of a very different pattern and fashion (in a manner of speaking, if you understand my metaphor, we are all of us shoemakers).
Indeed, it seems that in defining contraries of every kind men have recourse to a spatial metaphor, for they say that those things are contraries which, within the same class, are separated by the greatest possible distance.
I know that breaking the ice might be a rather melancholy metaphor in this case.