metaphor


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Related to metaphor: simile

met·a·phor

 (mĕt′ə-fôr′, -fər)
n.
1. A figure of speech in which a word or phrase that ordinarily designates one thing is used to designate another, thus making an implicit comparison, as in "a sea of troubles" or "All the world's a stage" (Shakespeare).
2. One thing conceived as representing another; a symbol: "Hollywood has always been an irresistible, prefabricated metaphor for the crass, the materialistic, the shallow, and the craven" (Neal Gabler).

[Middle English methaphor, from Old French metaphore, from Latin metaphora, from Greek, transference, metaphor, from metapherein, to transfer : meta-, meta- + pherein, to carry; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

met′a·phor′ic (-fôr′ĭk), met′a·phor′i·cal adj.
met′a·phor′i·cal·ly adv.

metaphor

(ˈmɛtəfə; -ˌfɔː)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action that it does not literally denote in order to imply a resemblance, for example he is a lion in battle. Compare simile
[C16: from Latin, from Greek metaphora, from metapherein to transfer, from meta- + pherein to bear]
metaphoric, ˌmetaˈphorical adj
ˌmetaˈphorically adv
ˌmetaˈphoricalness n

met•a•phor

(ˈmɛt əˌfɔr, -fər)

n.
1. the application of a word or phrase to an object or concept it does not literally denote, suggesting comparison to that object or concept, as in "A mighty fortress is our God."
2. something used or regarded as being used to represent something else; symbol: the novel's use of the city as a metaphor for isolation.
[1525–35; < Latin < Greek metaphorá a transfer, n. derivative of metaphérein to transfer. See meta-, -phore]
met`a•phor′i•cal (-ˈfɔr ɪ kəl, -ˈfɒr-) met`a•phor′ic, adj.
met`a•phor′i•cal•ly, adv.

metaphor

  • trope - A figurative or metaphorical use of a word or phrase.
  • ingrain, ingrained - Ingrain literally means "work into the grain" (originally, of fabric), and ingrained is metaphorically "deep-seated."
  • farce - First meant forcemeat stuffing and came to be used metaphorically when a humorous play was "stuffed" in between two more serious acts of the main theatrical presentation—or for interludes of impromptu buffoonery in a dramatic presentation.
  • relieve - Metaphorically, to "alleviate, lighten," from Latin relevare, "raise again."

metaphor

1. A comparison of one person or thing with another by saying that the first is the second, as in “He was a tiger in combat.”
2. Use of an object or action to represent another. Mixed metaphor is the joining together of unmatched metaphors with ridiculous results.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metaphor - a figure of speech in which an expression is used to refer to something that it does not literally denote in order to suggest a similaritymetaphor - a figure of speech in which an expression is used to refer to something that it does not literally denote in order to suggest a similarity
figure of speech, trope, image, figure - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
dead metaphor, frozen metaphor - a metaphor that has occurred so often that it has become a new meaning of the expression (e.g., `he is a snake' may once have been a metaphor but after years of use it has died and become a new sense of the word `snake')
mixed metaphor - a combination of two or more metaphors that together produce a ridiculous effect
synesthetic metaphor - a metaphor that exploits a similarity between experiences in different sense modalities

metaphor

noun figure of speech, image, symbol, analogy, emblem, conceit (literary), allegory, trope, figurative expression the writer's use of metaphor
Translations
إسْتِعارَه، مَجازمجاز
metafora
metafor
metafora
metafora
metafora
myndhvörf
ひゆ比喩
metafora
metafora
metafora
metafor
benzetmemecazmetafor

metaphor

[ˈmetəfɔːʳ] Nmetáfora f
see also mixed B

metaphor

[ˈmɛtəfɔːr] nmétaphore f
a metaphor for sth → une métaphore pour qch
... to mix my metaphors ... → ... si j'ose cette métaphore ...

metaphor

nMetapher f; to mix one’s metaphorsunterschiedliche Metaphern zusammen verwenden

metaphor

[ˈmɛtəfəʳ] nmetafora

metaphor

(ˈmetəfə) noun
a form of expression (not using `like' or `as')in which a quality or characteristic is given to a person or thing by using a name, image, adjective etc normally used of something else which has similar qualities etc. `He's a tiger when he's angry' is an example of (a) metaphor.
ˌmetaˈphoric(al) (-ˈfo-) adjective
of, like or using metaphors. metaphorical language.
ˌmetaˈphorically adverb
References in classic literature ?
Sometimes too we qualify the metaphor by adding the term to which the proper word is relative.
William Rodney, upon the Elizabethan use of metaphor.
But the whole, to continue the same metaphor, consists in the cookery of the author; for, as Mr Pope tells us--
When I say petticoat, I use the word in its literal sense, not colloquially as a metaphor for its usual wearer, meaning thereby a dainty feminine undergarment seen only by men on rainy days, and one might add washing-days.
I use all the hyperbole of metaphor, and tell what centuries of time and profounds of unthinkable agony and horror can obtain in each interval of all the intervals between the notes of a quick jig played quickly on the piano.
I declare that this bold metaphor is admirable, and that the natural history of the theatre, on a day of allegory and royal marriage songs, is not in the least startled by a dolphin who is the son of a lion.
He recollected Cronshaw's whimsical metaphor of the Persian carpet; he had thought of it often; but Cronshaw with his faun-like humour had refused to make his meaning clear: he repeated that it had none unless one discovered it for oneself.
You have at all events taken your share in using good practical precautions for the town, and that is the best mode of asking for protection," said Lydgate, with a strong distaste for the broken metaphor and bad logic of the banker's religion, somewhat increased by the apparent deafness of his sympathy.
Indeed, it seems that in defining contraries of every kind men have recourse to a spatial metaphor, for they say that those things are contraries which, within the same class, are separated by the greatest possible distance.
Stelling concluded that Tom's brain, being peculiarly impervious to etymology and demonstrations, was peculiarly in need of being ploughed and harrowed by these patent implements; it was his favorite metaphor, that the classics and geometry constituted that culture of the mind which prepared it for the reception of any subsequent crop.
They were handsome girls, had the fresh colour of their country upbringing, and in their eyes that brilliancy which is called-- by no metaphor, alas
At the very instant, at the first sound of his voice, to carry on the Virgilian metaphor, D'Artagnan's recruits, recognizing each his sovereign lord, discontinued their plank-fighting and trestle blows.