metaphysics


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Related to metaphysics: quantum physics

met·a·phys·ics

 (mĕt′ə-fĭz′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) Philosophy The branch of philosophy that examines the nature of reality, including the relationship between mind and matter, substance and attribute, fact and value.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The theoretical or first principles of a particular discipline: the metaphysics of law.
3. (used with a sing. verb) A priori speculation upon questions that are unanswerable to scientific observation, analysis, or experiment.
4. (used with a sing. verb) Excessively subtle or recondite reasoning.

[From pl. of Middle English methaphisik, from Medieval Latin metaphysica, from Medieval Greek (ta) metaphusika, from Greek (Ta) meta (ta) phusika, (the works) after the Physics, the title of Aristotle's treatise on first principles (so called because it followed his work on physics) : meta, after; see meta- + phusika, physics; see physics.]

metaphysics

(ˌmɛtəˈfɪzɪks)
n (functioning as singular)
1. (Philosophy) the branch of philosophy that deals with first principles, esp of being and knowing
2. (Philosophy) the philosophical study of the nature of reality, concerned with such questions as the existence of God, the external world, etc
3. (Philosophy) See descriptive metaphysics
4. (popularly) abstract or subtle discussion or reasoning
[C16: from Medieval Latin, from Greek ta meta ta phusika the things after the physics, from the arrangement of the subjects treated in the works of Aristotle]
metaphysician, metaphysicist n

met•a•phys•ics

(ˌmɛt əˈfɪz ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
1. the branch of philosophy that treats of first principles, includes ontology and cosmology, and is intimately connected with epistemology.
2. philosophy, esp. in its more abstruse branches.

metaphysics

a branch of philosophy concerned with being, first principles, and often including aspects of cosmology and epistemology. — metaphysician, n.metaphysical, adj.
See also: Philosophy

metaphysics

A branch of philosophy dealing with questions of being.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metaphysics - the philosophical study of being and knowingmetaphysics - the philosophical study of being and knowing
hypostasis - (metaphysics) essential nature or underlying reality
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
ontology - the metaphysical study of the nature of being and existence
cosmology - the metaphysical study of the origin and nature of the universe
entelechy - (Aristotle) the state of something that is fully realized; actuality as opposed to potentiality
Translations

metaphysics

[ˌmetəˈfɪzɪks] NSINGmetafísica f

metaphysics

[ˌmɛtəˈfɪzɪks] nmétaphysique f

metaphysics

n singMetaphysik f

metaphysics

[ˌmɛtəˈfɪzɪks] nsgmetafisica
References in classic literature ?
Jo knew nothing about philosophy or metaphysics of any sort, but a curious excitement, half pleasurable, half painful, came over her as she listened with a sense of being turned adrift into time and space, like a young balloon out on a holiday.
cried the old gentleman, growing more and more testy at these glimpses of Clifford's metaphysics.
This was a case of metaphysics, at least as difficult for Joe to deal with, as for me.
However, I don't propose to discuss politics, sociology, or metaphysics with you.
I should find myself, therefore, more at my ease, FACILUS NATANS, in a subject of my own choice, which would be to these hard theological questions what morals are to metaphysics in philosophy.
He could not give up his dancing-lessons, because he made his bread by them, and metaphysics would not have found him in so much as salt to his bread.
There were occasional gatherings of long-coated theatrical natives who discussed metaphysics in English and Bengali, to Mr Lurgan's great edification.
It is to Bon-Bon - but let this go no farther - it is to Bon-Bon that Kant himself is mainly indebted for his metaphysics.
Everything was then viewed without metaphysics, without exaggeration, without magnifying glass, with the naked eye.
He had long come to the conclusion that nothing amused him more than metaphysics, but he was not so sure of their efficacy in the affairs of life.
He, being a humorist, explained to them the method of the celebrated Dickensian essay on Chinese Metaphysics by the gentleman who read an article on China and an article on Metaphysics and combined the information.
In fact, it is quite unpractical, and, as in this age to be practical is everything, I shall go back to Philosophy and study Metaphysics.