metatarsus

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met·a·tar·sus

 (mĕt′ə-tär′səs)
n. pl. met·a·tar·si (-sī, -sē)
1. The middle part of the human foot that forms the instep and includes the five bones between the toes and the ankle.
2. The corresponding part of the hind foot in quadrupeds or of the foot in birds.

metatarsus

(ˌmɛtəˈtɑːsəs)
n, pl -si (-saɪ)
1. (Anatomy) the skeleton of the human foot between the toes and the tarsus, consisting of five long bones
2. (Zoology) the corresponding skeletal part in other vertebrates

met•a•tar•sus

(ˌmɛt əˈtɑr səs)

n., pl. -si (-sī).
the bones of a vertebrate hind limb between the tarsus and the toes, or phalanges.
[1670–80; < New Latin; see meta-, tarsus]

metatarsus


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The five metatarsal bones located between the ankle and the toes. See metacarpus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metatarsus - the skeleton of the human foot between the toes and the tarsusmetatarsus - the skeleton of the human foot between the toes and the tarsus; the corresponding part of the foot in birds or of the hind foot in quadrupeds
metatarsal - any bone of the foot between the ankle and the toes
pedal extremity, vertebrate foot - the extremity of the limb in vertebrates
skeletal structure - any structure created by the skeleton of an organism
Translations

metatarsus

[ˌmetəˈtɑːsəs] N (metatarsi (pl)) [ˌmetəˈtɑːsaɪ]metatarso m

metatarsus

[ˌmɛtəˈtɑːsəs] nmetatarso

met·a·tar·sus

n. metatarso, la parte formada por los cinco huesecillos del pie situados entre el tarso y los dedos.
References in periodicals archive ?
Leg I with yellow coxae, trochanters pale brown with yellow band ventrally, remaining segments pale brown; leg II yellow throughout, with dark bands on lateral sides of femora; legs III and IV with coxae, trochanters, femora and patellae all yellow proximally and dark brown distally, tibiae yellow with dark brown medial and distal bands, metatarsi yellow with dark spot located distally on the ventral side, and tarsi yellow.
Legs slightly slender (especially those of males), with 3 claws on the tarsi, many spines on femora, tibiae, and metatarsi.
Dark stripe prolaterally along patellae, tibiae and metatarsi of legs I and II.
Leg spination in males: femora I-III: p1-1-1; d0-1-1; r1-1-1; femur IV: p1-1-1; d0-1-1; r 0-0-1; tibiae I-IV: p1-0-1; d0-0-1; r1-0-1; v2-2-0; metatarsi I-IV: p1-1-0; r1-1-0; v2-2-0.
First pair of legs longer and thicker than rest, with long dense black hairs on ventral surface of patellae, tibiae and metatarsi.
Legs medium length, I, IV longest, almost subequal, leg III shortest; trochanters not notched; tibiae with about four rows of trichobothria; metatarsi and tarsi with one row of trichobothria; trichobothria with both large and small hoods smooth, not striated (Figs.
Known males of two species have ventral cusps on the tibiae, metatarsi and tarsi of leg I, and also on the metatarsi of leg II, which are absent in females (Haddad & Lyle 2008).
In any case, Patarchaea does not possess the characteristic mimetid-like spines on the metatarsi of legs 1 and 2.
The unusual genus Lessertina Lawrence, 1942, considered by Bosselaers and Jocque (2000) to be Corinnidae incertae sedis and later as a Trachelinae genus (Bosselaers & Jocque 2002), is here considered Corinnidae incertae sedis due to conflicting genitalic morphology with other Trachelinae (particularly a palpal median apophysis and conductor in males) and ambiguity as to the homology of the "ventral cusp" on the anterior metatarsi.
Legs I to IV uniform pale yellow; dense scopulae on metatarsi and tarsi, remaining leg segments covered in fine, less dense setae; leg spines and cusps present.
Scopulae present on 2/3 of metatarsi I, on distal half of metatarsi II, 1/3 on III and less than 1/4 distal of metatarsi IV.