metformin


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met·for·min

 (mĕt-fôr′mĭn)
n.
An oral hypoglycemic drug, C4H11N5, usually used in its hydrochloride form, that decreases glucose production by the liver and increases peripheral glucose uptake, used to treat type 2 diabetes.

[Probably met(hyl) + form(ic acid) + -in.]

metformin

(mɛtˈfɔːmɪn)
n
(Pharmacology) a drug, C4H11N5, used to treat type 2 diabetes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metformin - an antidiabetic drug (trade name Glucophage) prescribed to treat type II diabetes
antidiabetic, antidiabetic drug - a drug used to treat diabetes mellitus
Translations

metformin

n metformina
References in periodicals archive ?
1, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Six months of adjunctive metformin therapy does not improve glycemic outcomes in overweight adolescents with type 1 diabetes, according to new research from T1D Exchange and funded by the JDRF.
A further study published in Cancer Prevention Research found that low doses of 250 mg per day of metformin administered for four weeks to nondiabetic patients suppressed markers for colorectal cancer.
STOCKHOLM -- Clinicians might want to consider more routinely monitoring levels of vitamin Bp in their diabetic patients who are using metformin, according to data from the HOME (Hyperinsulinaemia: The Outcome of Its Metabolic Effects) randomized controlled trial, which showed that [B.
com/research/2dvdjm/investigation) has announced the addition of the "Investigation Report on China's Metformin Market, 2010-2019" report to their offering.
Her home medications included potassium 20 mEq daily, Lasix 80 mg twice a day, metformin 850 mg twice a day, Novolin R sliding scale, and metoprolol tartrate 100 mg daily.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved INVOKAMET , a fixed-dose therapy combining canagliflozin and metformin hydrochloride in a single tablet, for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes.
The result of a study conducted by researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar (WCMC-Q) on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of widely used diabetes drug -- metformin -- has been published in the British Journal of Pharmacology.
Experiments carried out by researchers in the laboratory of WCMC-Q's Dr Chris Triggle demonstrate that metformin, the first-choice hypoglycemic drug prescribed to most type-2 diabetes sufferers, interacts with the so-called 'longevity gene' SIRT1 to protect the user's vascular system against deterioration caused by glucose toxicity.
Like an aging actor rediscovered after being typecast for years, the long-standing diabetes drug metformin is poised to reinvent itself.
MK2's compatibility with metformin makes it a very exciting potential drug target," lead author Ira Tabas said.
Recent data suggest that metformin may aid in cancer prevention and potentially prevent tumour recurrence.
Scientists believe the drug, metformin, may mimic the effects of extreme calorie restriction.