methyl isocyanate


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methyl isocyanate

n.
A toxic flammable colorless liquid, C2H3NO, used in the manufacture of carbamate pesticides.

meth′yl isocy′anate


n.
a highly toxic, flammable, colorless liquid, CH3NCO, used in the manufacture of pesticides.
References in periodicals archive ?
Investigations into the disaster revealed that something had gone fundamentally wrong with a tank storing lethal methyl isocyanate (MIC).
Verma lost both his parents and five siblings on the night of December 3, 1984, when 27 tons of methyl isocyanate and other poisonous gases leaked out from the Union Carbide pesticide plant in Bhopal, the capital of Madhya Pradesh state.
The Bhopal Saga is an attempt to bring order from the chaos of events before, during, and after the methyl isocyanate (MIC) release.
As an example, a change in the sequence of steps in the reactions process of producing the insecticide Carbaryl has eliminated the potentially dangerous methyl isocyanate as an intermediate product.
A cocktail of chemicals seeped out, including Methyl Isocyanate (MIC) - a substance so dangerous it is known as liquid dynamite.
The case study was a thorough examination of historical and other public documents involved in the 1984 methyl isocyanate release at the Union Carbide plant in Bhopal, India.
Mr Anderson was boss of Union Carbide whose pesticide plant in Madhya Pradesh used deadly methyl isocyanate - MIC.
The 1984 Union Carbide chemical disaster of Bhopal, India, in which methyl isocyanate (MIC) leaked from a tank and killed close to 4,000 people and disabled thousands more, raised awareness and concern among legislators in the U.
Environmentalists warn it's only a matter of time before we're treated to a tragedy on the scale of the 1984 accident in Bhopal, India -- where 3,500 people were suffocated in their sleep by a 20-ton cloud of methyl isocyanate seeping from a Union Carbide plant.
Normally Union Carbide does not allow MIC, methyl isocyanate, a pesticide component, to be stored.
More than 44 million Americans five within range of a poisonous chemical cloud that could be formed by a facility located in their zip code," said Hillel Gray of the NELC, recalling to mind the toxic cloud of methyl isocyanate that engulfed the city of Bhopal, India, after an accident at a Union Carbide facility.
SARA, an Epa-generated federal standard, was passed in 1986 as a result of the 1984 chemical tragedy in Bhopal, India, in which a release of toxic methyl isocyanate gas from a Union Carbide chemical plant killed more than 2,500 people and injured tens of thousands of others.