metrically


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met·ri·cal

 (mĕt′rĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or composed in poetic meter: metrical verse; five metrical units in a line.
2. Relating to measurement.

[Middle English, from Latin metricus, from Greek metrikos, from metron, measure, poetic meter; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

met′ri·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.metrically - with regard to metermetrically - with regard to meter; "metrically, these poems are matched"
References in classic literature ?
The metrical structure of each stanza is elaborate (differing in different poems), but metrically all the strophes and antistrophes in any given poem must be exactly identical with each other and different from the epodes.
The first line in all examples is from the metrically restored text provided in van Nooten and Holland 1994, with the corresponding metrical structure.
My main focus, metrically speaking, is on how Hardy develops in each stanza particular rhythmical motifs that ring the changes on a general metrical principle, whereby a certain local, residual influx of vitality collapses within the prevailing entropy.
Or maybe the stanza's function is more purely formal: sonically introducing the "t" that will dominate the final couplet, metrically mediating the first line's trochees and the fifth line's cretic with a third line suggesting either.
The metrically displaced melody features interesting harmonic choices chromaticized with tritone-infused flavors.
For the metrically challenged, that means it will bring about 8 gallons of water to a boil using just about 2.
The editors selected Bodleian Library MS Ashmole 46 as the base-text for their edition of the Extra Miracles because it is more metrically and orthographically regular than the other manuscripts.
But Owen Temple, a Liberal Democrat county councillor who issued a legal challenge to the council over its decision to build on Belle Vue, said: "For younger and metrically literate readers, pouring a quart into a pint pot is the old way to describe trying to fit a litre of water into a half litre bottle.
The same is true for literature, which subsumes texts written to be read alone like most novels from the 20th century; texts meant to be performed, like songs and plays; texts which are strictly metrically organized; and texts which have no metrical organisation at all, etc.
Through this, the student can perceive where the structural tones are placed metrically, as well as the particular manner in which each is embellished.
Whilst metrically insightful, his reading of "Le Bateau ivre" is uncontroversially posited on the precariousness of interpretation.
257), in particular, allows Murphy some convincing thematic interpretations of metrically problematic lines.