keratitis

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ker·a·ti·tis

 (kĕr′ə-tī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of the cornea.

keratitis

(ˌkɛrəˈtaɪtɪs)
n
(Pathology) inflammation of the cornea

ker•a•ti•tis

(ˌkɛr əˈtaɪ tɪs)

n.
inflammation of the cornea.
[1855–60]

keratitis

an inflamed condition of the cornea.
See also: Eyes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.keratitis - inflammation of the cornea causing watery painful eyes and blurred vision
inflammation, redness, rubor - a response of body tissues to injury or irritation; characterized by pain and swelling and redness and heat
Translations

ker·a·ti·tis

n. queratitis, infl. de la córnea;
interstitial ______ intersticial;
mycotic ______ micótica, queratomicosis, infección fungal de la córnea;
trophic ______ trófica, causada por el virus del herpes.

keratitis

n queratitis f
References in periodicals archive ?
2] Risk factors for moderate to severe microbial keratitis in daily wear contact lens wearers, Ophthalmology, Aug.
Lead researcher Craig Winstanley, said that microbial keratitis can be devastating for a patient and it is important that the risk of developing this condition is reduced in contact lens wearers by improving contact lens disinfectant solutions.
Topical fourth-generation fluoroquinolones should be reserved for confirmed cases of microbial keratitis to limit antibiotic resistance and maintain susceptibility of ocular pathogens to this drug.
There are around 1,200 new cases of contact lens-related infection microbial keratitis each year in the UK's three million contact lens wearers.
But habits like these pose a serious risk to eyes, causing dangerous eye diseases like corneal infection and microbial keratitis.
Incidence and risk factors for microbial keratitis in Hong Kong: comparison with Europe and North America.
Lenses can cause microbial keratitis, a condition in which the outer layer of the eye, the cornea, becomes inflamed after infection by bacteria, fungi or amoebae.
Microbial keratitis as a complication of corneal exposure in ICU patients has been consistently reported despite preventative measures (13-15).
Thus, the analysis of such associated risk factors and the isolated microbial aetiology will help in understanding the relationship between risk factors and microbial keratitis, and is essential for initiation of empirical antimicrobial therapy with subjective interpretation of presenting clinical features for practicing ophthalmologist.
Microbial keratitis caused by bacteria is the most serious response seen during lens wear (1 in 1000 wearers) and can lead to vision impairment and, in serious cases, to permanent vision loss.
has received a $100,000 grant from the National Eye Institute, a member agency of the National Institute of Health, to study the use of ECI developed Protector Proteins to combat microbial keratitis.
7million Britons, are already known to be the chief cause of a rare infection of the cornea called microbial keratitis.

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