microbiome


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mi·cro·bi·ome

 (mī′krō-bī′ōm′)
n.
1. The complete genetic content of all the microorganisms that typically inhabit a particular environment, especially a site on or in the body, such as the skin or the gastrointestinal tract.

microbiome

(ˌmaɪkrəʊˈbaɪəʊm)
n
(Microbiology) the microscopic organisms, such as bacteria, which inhabit the human body in a symbiotic relationship
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References in periodicals archive ?
With the Human Microbiome Market expected to reach $658 million by 2023 from $294 million in 2019 growing at a CAGR of 22.
Tenders are invited for Development of bacteriophage-based tools to study the effects the gut microbiome has on the development of environmental enteric dysfunction in children in low income settings
ENTEROME Bioscience SA, a pioneer in the development of therapeutic solutions (drugs and diagnostics) based on a deep understanding of the gut microbiome, is pleased to announce that Georges Gemayel PhD has joined the Enterome board as a Non-executive Chairman.
The Microbiome experiment examines the impact of space travel on both an individual's microbiome, which is the community of microorganisms that literally share our body space, and the human immune system.
Changes to the gut microbiome last at least nine years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or gastric banding surgery, scientists report in the Aug.
Several sub-projects focus on analysis with broad implications for neurologic and psychological research; these include a project focusing on the microbiomes of intensive care unit patients, a longitudinal study of the infant fecal microbiome, and a large autism spectrum project that is collecting microbiome samples from individuals with autism spectrum disorder and as many of their family members as possible.
3) They report that TCDF exposure alters the gut microbiome in ways that may prove to contribute to obesity and other metabolic diseases.
The researchers connected changes in the mouse microbiome to the performance.
The microbiome -- the trillions of mostly beneficial bacteria that share our bodies -- plays a critical role in maintaining health.
The establishment of an infant's gut microbiome rests on a number of prenatal and postnatal factors, according to a 2014 Canadian review article.
The human microbiome is defined as the collective genomes of the microbes (composed of bacteria, bacteriophages, fungi, protozoa and viruses) that live inside and on the human body, and there are approximately 10 microbes and 100 microbial genes for each human cell and gene respectively.