microbiota

(redirected from microbiotic)
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Related to microbiotic: macrobiotic

mi·cro·bi·o·ta

 (mī′krō-bī-ō′tə)
n.
(used with a sing. or pl. verb) The microorganisms that typically inhabit a particular environment, such as the soil, a body of water, or a site on or in an organism, considered as a group. Also called microbiome.

microbiota

(ˌmaɪkrəʊbaɪˈəʊtə)
pl n
(Biology) microfauna and microflora, esp of a specific epoch, habitat, or region
References in periodicals archive ?
A comprehensive predicting model using a combination of clinical, genetic, microbiotic factors and biomarkers will ideally resolve this unanswered question.
The findings suggest that modifying the microbiotic makeup of the gut can become an innovative method to prevent stroke, they added.
Healthy individuals posses a diverse gut microbiota but a reduced microbiotic richness gives rise to Type 2 diabetes, obesity and inflammatory bowel disease, said the team from Pennington Biomedical Research Centre in US.
The researchers point out that healthy individuals have diverse gut microbiota and many of the common pathologies of the 21st century, including type 2 diabetes, obesity and inflammatory bowel disease, are associated with reduced microbiotic richness.
Our hypothesis is that some genetic, metabolic, or microbiotic finger-print will help us identify who is predisposed to lose weight on one diet versus the other.
In spring, the microbiotic population level is at low ebb as the cold temperatures and frozen soil have suppressed their increase.
Microbiotic soil crusts: a review of their roles in soil and ecological processes in the rangelands of Australia.
Furthermore, the dissolution of carbonate-C in biochars, such as under the influence of microbiotic crusts and acidic rain (Monger and Martinez-Rios 2001), can overestimate the mineralisation of biochar C and thus induce an underestimation of its C stability (Calvelo Pereira et at.
What you may already know of the mi-crobiome is probably related to digestive-aiding probiotics, made up of microbiotic organisms that help maintain a healthy "gut culture and the negative effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics on the body's "good" bugs.
Metagenomic epidemiology is a multi-layered approach that considers the entire microbiotic context for environmental antibiotic resistance by characterizing simultaneously the different levels of microbiome complexity that drive antibiotic resistance including ARGs, genetic vectors, and the species in which these genes occur (Baquero 2012).
These mechanisms include metabolic impairment, vascular changes in periodontium, changes of microbiotic flora in periodontal pocket and functional disorders of leukocytes.
When out of balance, the microbiotic environment may play a role in the development of obesity, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, colorectal cancer, irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease and other conditions.