microculture


Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

mi·cro·cul·ture

 (mī′krō-kŭl′chər)
n.
1. Biology A small-scale culture of microorganisms, cells, or tissues.
2. Sociology The distinctive culture of a small group of people within a limited geographical area or within an organization such as a school or business.

microculture

(ˈmaɪkrəʊˌkʌltʃə)
n
1. (Biology) the experimental growth of a very small number of microorganisms
2. (Biology) a very small group of microorganisms grown experimentally

mi•cro•cul•ture

(ˈmaɪ kroʊˌkʌl tʃər)

n.
the culture of a group living within a limited geographical area.
[1940–45]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
4] exponentially growing cells were seeded in 96-well microculture plates with various compound concentrations.
It is the microculture in the local department and the events that happen in proximity that make the most difference in how employees feel at the end of the day.
A semi-automated microculture method for investigating growth effects of cytotoxic compounds on exponentially growing carcinoma cells.
The Microculture Kinetic Assay, also called the MiCK[R] assay or Correct Chemo[TM], identifies the most effective chemotherapy drug or drug combination to kill a patient's specific cancer cells.
30, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- DiaTech Life Sciences has announced the formation of a Medical Advisory Council to advance the use of the Microculture Kinetic (MiCK) assay for apoptosis, a new assay designed to predict which chemotherapy is most effective for cancer patients.
Growth and development in microculture of gametophytes from stored spores of Equisetam.
Le joueur se fabrique un outillage identitaire et une microculture faits d'une communaute, de mythes, de mondes anciens comme autant de strates.
Consumer value systems in the age of postmodern fragmentation: the case of the natural health microculture, Journal of Consumer Research 28: 550-571.
Relationships of mixed cultures have to make their microculture a thriving one that continues to create a larger culture of tolerance, diversity, and peace.
Microculture for the isolation of Leishmania parasites from cutaneous lesions--Sri Lankan experience.
Second, the way s/he stories and lives the moment draws on an embeddedness in discourse and relationships connecting him/her to a family, a society, a microculture, and a moment in history, all of which bring into that experience far more than can ever appear in a telling of it.
Through Several Generations of a Laboratory Microculture, 62 J.