microform

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Related to microforms: microfilm, microfiche

mi·cro·form

 (mī′krə-fôrm′)
n.
An arrangement of images reduced in size, as on microfilm or microfiche.

microform

(ˈmaɪkrəʊˌfɔːm)
n
(Computer Science) computing a method of storing symbolic information by using photographic reduction techniques, such as microfilm, microfiche, etc

mi•cro•form

(ˈmaɪ krəˌfɔrm)

n.
any form, either film or paper, containing microreproductions.
[1955–60]

microform

A generic term for any form, whether film, video tape, paper, or other medium, containing miniaturized or otherwise compressed images which cannot be read without special display devices.
Translations

microform

[ˈmaɪkrəʊˌfɔːm] Nmicroforma f
References in periodicals archive ?
Digitization activities targeting different sectors formed into three lots (Lot 6 photo paper, microforms Lot 7, Lot 8 sound collections) within federal scientific institutions.
The Microforms Department of the University of New Brunswick's Harriet Irving Library is pleased to present to the public the Marianne Grey Otty Database.
Guide to microforms in print 2008; incorporating international microforms in print, supplement.
Other spaces open to the public are devoted to magazines, posters, stamps, postal cards, digital documents, microforms, and printed papers in addition to a multimedia space.
The library enjoys an international reputation and in addition to its collection of material from the rest of the UK and Ireland, the Aberystwyth institution possesses an unrivalled collection of Celtic works about Wales, including books and pamphlets, magazines and newspapers, microforms, ephemera, and a wealth of electronic material.
Since 1997, UMI, the former University Microforms, Inc, and now a division of Bell and Howell Corporation, has accepted electronic theses and dissertations in three categories: single file text document, compound document and CD-Rom.
World Cat does not disclose when the microforms were created, so it is difficult to know whether they were circulating while Rooks researched this book.
Its collections include microforms, photographs, printed materials and other items relating to the history of Wilberforce University, the history of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and 19th century publications by or about African Americans.
His particular concern is with microforms (microfilm, microfiche, and micro-cards), along with digitization, lamination, and mass de-acidification.
5 million volumes, 17,000 current journals, and extensive collections of microforms, maps, scores, sound recordings, and videotapes.
Selectors may safely assume that, with proper care, microforms and audiovisual materials can be adequately preserved.