middlebrow


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.

mid·dle·brow

 (mĭd′l-brou′)
n. Informal
One who is somewhat cultured, with conventional tastes and interests; one who is neither highbrow nor lowbrow.


mid′dle·brow′ adj.

middlebrow

(ˈmɪdəlˌbraʊ)
n
a person with conventional tastes and limited cultural appreciation
adj
of or appealing to middlebrows: middlebrow culture.
ˈmiddleˌbrowism n

mid•dle•brow

(ˈmɪd lˌbraʊ)

n.
1. a person of conventional tastes and interests; a moderately cultivated person.
adj.
2. characteristic of or catering to middlebrows.
[1920–25]
mid′dle•brow`ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.middlebrow - someone who is neither a highbrow nor a lowbrowmiddlebrow - someone who is neither a highbrow nor a lowbrow
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
Translations

middlebrow

[ˈmɪdlbraʊ]
A. ADJde or para gusto medianamente culto, de gusto entre intelectual y plebeyo

middlebrow

middle-brow [ˈmɪdəlbraʊ] adjgrand public invmiddle class nclasse f moyenne
the growth of a large middle class → le développement d'une importante classe moyenne
the middle class → la classe moyenne
the middle classes → les classes fpl moyennesmiddle-class [ˌmɪdəlˈklɑːs] adj
[people, family] → de la classe moyenne
a middle-class family → une famille de la classe moyenne
to be middle-class [person] → être bourgeois(e)
[home, suburb, area] → bourgeois(e)
[attitudes, values, culture, life] → bourgeois(e)middle course n (between more extreme alternatives)juste milieu m, voie f médianemiddle-distance race ncourse f de demi-fondmiddle-distance runner ncoureur/euse m/f de demi-fondmiddle ear noreille f moyenneMiddle East n
the Middle East → le Moyen-Orient
in the Middle East → au Moyen-Orient

middlebrow

[ˈmɪdlˌbraʊ] (pej)
1. adj (fiction, play, film) per il lettore o spettatore ecc medio
2. nchi ha una cultura media
References in periodicals archive ?
Too Close to Home: Middlebrow Anti-Modernism and the Poetry of Edna Jacques.
Caroline Pollentier addresses Woolf's publication of "occasional, non-review essays" in "Virginia Woolf and the Middlebrow Market of the Familiar Essay" (138).
More specifically, topics include jazz music in Polish interwar poetry, Wyndham Lewis and the inter-war popular novel, Picasso and mass print media, and middlebrow perspectives on European literature in Flemish radio talks (1936-37), among others.
More precisely, the line I refer to is that between the middlebrow and the highbrow writer.
Mulling a middlebrow brew of Big Bang theories and spiritual concerns, DiPietro's compact, neatly crafted drama focuses more on Claire's growing faith and its effect upon her marriage than upon hotly debating the issues.
Are usually seen as occupying a cultural position between the highbrow (the formal and intellectual challenges of modernism) and the lowbrow (the mass-produced and disposable romances and thrillers), and their proliferation is usually attributed to the expansion of the reading public in the wake of the 1870 and 1918 Education Acts, serviced by the many lending libraries (the class-related credentials calibrated in relation to whether they were free or paying), coupled with the interwar expansion of the middle classes, the principal social group to which the middlebrow appealed.
I suspect that he was too busy with other duties to visit Middlebrow often.
middlebrow and lowbrow chatter may give him an inflated sense of intellectual and moral superiority, but he's not fooling anyone.
The terms middlebrow and genteel are often mentioned in silent cinema history, but usually as epithets that tend to bracket this history despite the fact that it worked and persisted for quite a while--from the early extension education programs of the 1910s to the 1930s work of Great Books intellectuals like Mortimer Adler.
Middlebrow literature flourished in the midst of an economically conditioned crisis of the book, the subsequent rationalization of publishing in the late 1920s, its increasing attention to consumer tastes, and its engagement with new media.
Chapter Three, "Making It New: Middlebrow Literary Culture and Twentieth-Century Suffrage Fiction," examines feminist activists in Marjorie Shuler's epistolary novel For Rent--One Pedestal and composite novel The Sturdy Oak, as well as Oreola Haskell's short story cycle Banner Bearers.
48)--is empirical and cannot tell us much unless we take a closer look at publishing history, the relation of highbrow to middlebrow fiction in different countries, etc.