middlebrow


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mid·dle·brow

 (mĭd′l-brou′)
n. Informal
One who is somewhat cultured, with conventional tastes and interests; one who is neither highbrow nor lowbrow.


mid′dle·brow′ adj.

middlebrow

(ˈmɪdəlˌbraʊ)
n
a person with conventional tastes and limited cultural appreciation
adj
of or appealing to middlebrows: middlebrow culture.
ˈmiddleˌbrowism n

mid•dle•brow

(ˈmɪd lˌbraʊ)

n.
1. a person of conventional tastes and interests; a moderately cultivated person.
adj.
2. characteristic of or catering to middlebrows.
[1920–25]
mid′dle•brow`ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.middlebrow - someone who is neither a highbrow nor a lowbrowmiddlebrow - someone who is neither a highbrow nor a lowbrow
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
Translations

middlebrow

[ˈmɪdlbraʊ]
A. ADJde or para gusto medianamente culto, de gusto entre intelectual y plebeyo

middlebrow

middle-brow [ˈmɪdəlbraʊ] adjgrand public invmiddle class nclasse f moyenne
the growth of a large middle class → le développement d'une importante classe moyenne
the middle class → la classe moyenne
the middle classes → les classes fpl moyennesmiddle-class [ˌmɪdəlˈklɑːs] adj
[people, family] → de la classe moyenne
a middle-class family → une famille de la classe moyenne
to be middle-class [person] → être bourgeois(e)
[home, suburb, area] → bourgeois(e)
[attitudes, values, culture, life] → bourgeois(e)middle course n (between more extreme alternatives)juste milieu m, voie f médianemiddle-distance race ncourse f de demi-fondmiddle-distance runner ncoureur/euse m/f de demi-fondmiddle ear noreille f moyenneMiddle East n
the Middle East → le Moyen-Orient
in the Middle East → au Moyen-Orient

middlebrow

[ˈmɪdlˌbraʊ] (pej)
1. adj (fiction, play, film) per il lettore o spettatore ecc medio
2. nchi ha una cultura media
References in periodicals archive ?
The collaborative work of Faye Hammill (Professor of English, University of Strathclyde, UK) and Michelle Smith (Lecturer in English and Creative Writing, University of Strathclyde, UK), "Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture: Canadian Periodicals in English and French, 1925-1960" announces a new cross-cultural approach to periodical studies, reading both French- and English-language magazines in relation to an emerging transatlantic middlebrow culture.
His politics, then, would have been anathema to those censorious leftists and middlebrow novelists who are taken seriously nowadays.
Actually, this material would find a ready market in Western middlebrow galleries, or the Royal Academy, although the subjects, even where not political, are frequently more forceful than those likely to be found in the R.
Between 2011 and 2013 Magazines, Travel, and Middlebrow Culture in Canada 1925-1960 (middlebrowcanada.
Turner, Tim Burton's "Big Eyes,'' about the Keanes, depicts a type of art that was decidedly middlebrow.
Aimed at a wide readership, Wilhelm's novel differs from the work of high-modernist lesbians like Gertrude Stein and Djuna Barnes with its middlebrow sensibilities.
The Hollywood Reporter called Grace of Monaco "relentlessly middlebrow mush," while Variety described it as a "cardboard and frequently cornball melodrama.
Martin's Press) Middlebrow Feminism in Classic British Detective Fiction by Melissa Schaub (Palgrave Macmillan)
Kessler-Harris explains the consequences of that exceptionalism: "Such qualities, often forgiven in death, might have been judged differently had Hellman not been female, or a displaced Southerner, or come from a Jewish background, or appealed to highbrow rather than middlebrow audiences.
Many books once thought to be literary (from 1957, James Gould Cozzens' turgid By Love Possessed) are now dismissed as middlebrow, and even pretentious.
The author's somewhat glamourless, unsuccessful, middlebrow yet eccentric teacher-narrator is utterly convincing, and yet one wonders what a French campus novel or detective fiction, written and narrated by a former university professor with a penchant for satire and a full range of intellectual sophistication at his command, would look like if Emelina were to turn in that direction in a future novel.
If middlebrow reading can be dismissed as "slick and predictable but varnished with ersatz seriousness," as William Deresiewicz characterized it recently in The American Scholar (November 2012), Oprah's Summer of Faulkner was middlebrow by definition.