middorsal

middorsal

(ˈmɪdˌdɔːsəl)
adj
(Zoology) located in the middle of the dorsum or back
References in periodicals archive ?
Here it was not to find the so-called "yellow globules" or "cytosomes" that Odiete (1978) described in some neurons of the middorsal lobes of the visceral ganglia of Scrobicularia plana; such globules were then characterized by displaying an electron-dense cortex and electron-lucent centrum.
The advisceral flow starts on the anterior side of the heart; moves toward the endostyle before arriving at the pharynx and the middorsal vessel, which supplies hemolymph to the digestive tract; and lastly passes to the dorsal end of the heart (Mukai et al.
Identifying characters of Argia apicalis in the southeast: (A) humeral stripe wide extending at least three-quarters of the pterothorax length; (B) middorsal line slightly wider than in northwestern A.
Lysmata grabhami presents a continuous middorsal white stripe from the tip of the rostrum to the end of the telson and the outer border of the uropodal exopods is also white (Figure 1).
3 Expansion at the midanterior points 22, 1 and 2 and midposterior LM points 11, 12 and 13 minimally stretching the middorsal carapace; compression at the right and left anterolateral and midlateral regions corresponding to LM points 4-10 and its opposite points.
From a ventral-to-dorsal direction, the pattern of seven stripes is composed of a pair of lateral stripes, a pair of dorsolateral stripes, a pair of paravertebral stripes, and a single middorsal, vertebral stripe (Fig.
cinereus (see Mitchell and Mazur, 1998): (1) the namesake red-backed phase in which the salamander exhibits a broad reddish to yellowish middorsal stripe, (2) the lead-backed phase wherein the aforementioned dorsal stripe is absent, (3) the erythristic phase wherein the salamander is uniformly red, lacking the lateral black pigment (Tilley et al.
roussaei, in turn, Grube noticed some differences between the Bay of Biscay (BB) specimens against the Martinique specimens; thus, he noticed that in Caribbean specimens branchiae start in a previous chaetiger (six-eight vs nine), that never cross the middorsal line (they do in the BB specimens), that branchiae have a larger number of filaments (40-47 vs 20-25), and that the branchiae are three times longer than dorsal cirri throughout the body (subequal in BB specimens).
01 mm), with the former being measured along the middorsal line, from the transverse ridge between the postorbital spines to the posterior edge of the carapace, and the latter at the greatest width of the carapace.
Radiographic examination revealed a single 3-mm diameter round metal opacity at the middorsal skull margin.
Body outline nearly circular except posterior border, exclusive of pleopods, almost straight; middorsal region of last pereomere and of all pleomeres markedly swollen dorsally.