midrib


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mid·rib

 (mĭd′rĭb′)
n.
The central or principal vein of a leaf.

midrib

(ˈmɪdˌrɪb)
n
(Botany) the main vein of a leaf, running down the centre of the blade

mid•rib

(ˈmɪdˌrɪb)

n.
the central or middle rib of a leaf.
[1690–1700]

mid·rib

(mĭd′rĭb′)
The central or main vein of a leaf. See more at leaf.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.midrib - the vein in the center of a leafmidrib - the vein in the center of a leaf  
nervure, vein - any of the vascular bundles or ribs that form the branching framework of conducting and supporting tissues in a leaf or other plant organ
References in periodicals archive ?
Midrib on adaxial leaf surface glabrous or with few trichomes [less than] 0.
During breeding stages, Pedersen incorporated two of several genes for a trait called "brown midrib," which is associated with reduced lignin.
Ovipositing females were found constructing silken web across the midrib and major lateral veins prior to the deposition of the eggs.
Cell shape is uniform with elongated cells with distinct thick midrib which is orangish yellow in colour.
The YML was normally the second leaf below the YOL; its maturity was evident from the darker green colour, and the thickening of the midrib and main veins compared with younger leaves.
Adaxial matte surface to subnitid, glabrous or slightly hirtellous on midrib, abaxial surface with the midrib, and sometimes lateral veins as well, most of which are slightly are puberulent or hirtellous and also with coarse, subapressed hairs, very densely tomentose, petiole 0.
The gene, Brown midrib (Bmr), encodes caffeic acid methyltransferase (COMT), a lignin-producing enzyme.
Plantain, on the other hand, has side veins and a midrib which all run parallel to one another down to the base of the plant.
37) well preserved at least in hemic and fibric peat, compressed, brown in color, blades translucent when viewed under lighted dissecting scope, gradually thinning from midrib to leaf margin.
Dracaena ``Massangeana,'' with a pale yellow stripe along the midrib of each leaf, and Dracaena ``Marginata,'' with red-margined leaves, will require a bit more sun to grow their best.
It is distinguished by biconvex leaf scars on the rhizomes, and deeply cordare, ovate to oblong leaves with a prominent midrib and pinnate venation.
Having read only Arnold Ages' review (May/June 2000) of Israel's Place in the Midrib East: A Pluralist Perspective, by Nissim Rejwan, not the book itself, it's hard to comment on it.