midrib


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mid·rib

 (mĭd′rĭb′)
n.
The central or principal vein of a leaf.

midrib

(ˈmɪdˌrɪb)
n
(Botany) the main vein of a leaf, running down the centre of the blade

mid•rib

(ˈmɪdˌrɪb)

n.
the central or middle rib of a leaf.
[1690–1700]

mid·rib

(mĭd′rĭb′)
The central or main vein of a leaf. See more at leaf.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.midrib - the vein in the center of a leafmidrib - the vein in the center of a leaf  
nervure, vein - any of the vascular bundles or ribs that form the branching framework of conducting and supporting tissues in a leaf or other plant organ
References in periodicals archive ?
ABSTRACT: This study was conducted to produce and evaluate a coconut leaf midrib charcoal as an alternative fuel for cooking, heating and grilling.
Each replicate of one-year-old citrus genotypes was inoculated by budding one midrib and one bud to ensure inoculation.
The analyzed variables for the transversal sections were the thickness of the blade in the midrib region and secondary vascular bundles, which were measured with the Anati Quant 2 [R] UFV program (Aguiar et al.
The hair density and length of hair on the lamina and veins showed a highly significant negative correlation with the jassids population while midrib hair density showed the negative and non significant effects, but by the simple linear equation the moisture percentage, plant height and number of primary branches showed non significant and positive correlation.
Both sides of the leaf blade fold downwards along the midrib Boat/Apical Bats make cuts almost parallel to the midrib of the--normally elongated--leaf, causing that both sides of the leaf blade fold downwards, however a deep cut in the apical tip's midrib also is performed
Camas, WA, USA)) and compare the results with those obtained from destructive measurements using the LI-3100 Licor", and non-destructive measurements using estimated leaf area through the midrib length of the leaves (Miller et al.
Remove any tough stems and ribs by folding the leaves in half vertically with the midrib side up, grasping the stem, and tearing the stem and midrib away.
The blades are about an inch wide with a whitish, off-centered midrib.
The leaves are relatively flat, oaklike in appearance, with irregular deep lobes, and they sometimes become frilly with a prominent reddish midrib with red veining.
Cut up the leaf into sections that each have a part of the midrib and a part of the leaf.