midrib

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Related to midribs: venation

mid·rib

 (mĭd′rĭb′)
n.
The central or principal vein of a leaf.

midrib

(ˈmɪdˌrɪb)
n
(Botany) the main vein of a leaf, running down the centre of the blade

mid•rib

(ˈmɪdˌrɪb)

n.
the central or middle rib of a leaf.
[1690–1700]

mid·rib

(mĭd′rĭb′)
The central or main vein of a leaf. See more at leaf.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.midrib - the vein in the center of a leafmidrib - the vein in the center of a leaf  
nervure, vein - any of the vascular bundles or ribs that form the branching framework of conducting and supporting tissues in a leaf or other plant organ
References in periodicals archive ?
The grafts and leaf midribs used for inoculation were obtained from HLB positive sweet orange (C.
It produces feathery rosy-pink blooms at this time of year and has arching leaves with white midribs that turn rich bronze in autumn.
NEW YORK -- Growing up in Pampanga, Angeles City, Lorina Tayag-Capitulo was always with her father, who drew giraffes and made flowers from cigarette foil and created 'bahay kubo' out of coconut midribs.
The characteristic reddish-brown to tan colored midribs of mutant leaf blades contrasts with the pale green midrib of wild-type leaf blades.
We are very fortunate that from this training, we have known that palm stalks and midribs have high pulp recovery and the fibers generated have strength comparable to abaca fibers, Melinda Bonayos, proprietor of the Double Day Handy Craft, said.
She buys the leaves from Asia Market in Manhattan's Chinatown, about a dozen a pack with the midribs cut out, folded like tablecloths.
This European plant has the added attraction of distinctive white midribs and veins on its prominent, arrow–shaped leaves.
Created using the midribs of coconut fronds, these charts were not referred to during the voyage.
Effects of aqueous extraction on the performance and properties of polypropylene/wood composites from date palm midribs and Acacia tortilis wood.
jamesoniana midrib not be construed phyllodic cases, because this type of anatomical structure here observed might equally well be taken to indicate that the organ showing is similar the midrib region of a Eudicotyledonous leaf, which may also have inverted bundles in midribs.
It was observed that the rate of drying the midribs is slower than the laminas therefore the midribs were separated from the laminas.
The other plant is ''sensitive plant'' (Mimosa pudica), which gets its name from the way its leaflets rapidly collapse along their midribs at the slightest touch.