midsummer


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mid·sum·mer

 (mĭd′sŭm′ər)
n.
1. The middle of the summer.
2. The summer solstice, on or about June 21 in the Northern Hemisphere.

midsummer

(ˈmɪdˈsʌmə)
n
1.
a. the middle or height of the summer
b. (as modifier): a midsummer carnival.
2. (Astronomy) another name for summer solstice

mid•sum•mer

(ˈmɪdˈsʌm ər, -ˌsʌm-)

n.
1. the middle of summer.
2. the summer solstice, around June 21.
adj.
3. of, pertaining to, or occurring in the middle of the summer.
[before 900]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.midsummer - June 21, when the sun is at its northernmost pointmidsummer - June 21, when the sun is at its northernmost point
June - the month following May and preceding July
solstice - either of the two times of the year when the sun is at its greatest distance from the celestial equator
summer, summertime - the warmest season of the year; in the northern hemisphere it extends from the summer solstice to the autumnal equinox; "they spent a lazy summer at the shore"
Translations
مُنْتَصَف الصَّيْف
uprostřed léta
midsommermidsommer-
nyárközép
JoninėsJoninių naktisvasarvidisvidurvasaris
vasaras vidus/saulgrieži
uprostred leta
yaz ortası

midsummer

[ˈmɪdˈsʌməʳ]
A. Npleno verano m
in midsummeren pleno verano
"Midsummer Night's Dream""El sueño de una noche de verano"
B. CPD Midsummer('s) Day NDía m de San Juan (24 junio)
midsummer madness Nlocura f pasajera

midsummer

[ˌmɪdˈsʌmər]
nle plein été m
in midsummer → en plein été
modif [day, morning] → d'été
a midsummer day in the midst of a heat-wave → un jour d'été en pleine canicule
"A Midsummer Night's Dream" by William Shakespeare → "Songe d'une nuit d'été" de William ShakespeareMidsummer Day Midsummer's Day nSaint-Jean fmid-term blues n [government] → chute f de popularité de milieu de mandatmidterm elections [ˌmɪdtɛrmɪˈlɛkʃənz] nplélections fpl de mi-mandatmidterm exams [ˌmɪdtɛrmɪgˈzæmz] nplexamens mpl de mi-trimestre

midsummer

[ˈmɪdˌsʌməʳ] npiena estate f

midsummer

(midˈsamə) noun
the middle of summer. It happened in midsummer; (also adjective) a midsummer day.
Midsummer ˈDay noun
the 24th of June when the saint's day of St. John the Baptist is celebrated.
Midsummer ˈEve noun
References in classic literature ?
Laurence and Aunt March, for when the stately old gentleman chass'ed solemnly up to the old lady, she just tucked her cane under arm, and hopped briskly away to join hands with the rest and dance about the bridal pair, while the young folks pervaded the garden like butterflies on a midsummer day.
The news had been brought, toward the decline of a day in midsummer, by an Indian runner, who also bore an urgent request from Munro, the commander of a work on the shore of the "holy lake," for a speedy and powerful reinforcement.
Spite of this frigid winter night in the boisterous Atlantic, spite of my wet feet and wetter jacket, there was yet, it then seemed to me, many a pleasant haven in store; and meads and glades so eternally vernal, that the grass shot up by the spring, untrodden, unwilted, remains at midsummer.
Later came midsummer, with the stifling heat, when the dingy killing beds of Durham's became a very purgatory; one time, in a single day, three men fell dead from sunstroke.
The day was as warm as midsummer, though it was only the middle of May, and Mr.
Jane had come to Highbury professedly for three months; the Campbells were gone to Ireland for three months; but now the Campbells had promised their daughter to stay at least till Midsummer, and fresh invitations had arrived for her to join them there.
Jennings, who knew nothing of all this, who knew only that the Colonel continued as grave as ever, and that she could neither prevail on him to make the offer himself, nor commission her to make it for him, began, at the end of two days, to think that, instead of Midsummer, they would not be married till Michaelmas, and by the end of a week that it would not be a match at all.
I had nothing else to do, because it was the vacation, and I sat at them from morning till noon, and from noon till night: the length of the midsummer days favoured my inclination to apply.
The limes were there, and the white thorns were there, and the chestnut-trees were there, and their leaves rustled harmoniously when I stopped to listen; but, the clink of Joe's hammer was not in the midsummer wind.
The sky was what is called a mackerel sky--rows and rows of faint down-plumes of cloud, just tinted with the midsummer sunset.
Midsummer eve had come, bringing deep verdure to the forest, and roses in her lap, of a more vivid hue than the tender buds of Spring.
Laurence sat in a recess near the book-ease, reading, not for the first time, the Midsummer Night's Dream.