mien


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Mien

 (myĕn)
n.
A Hmong-Mien language spoken by many subgroups of the Yao of China.

mien

 (mēn)
n.
1. Bearing or manner, especially as it reveals an inner state of mind: a colonel with an imperious mien.
2. An appearance or aspect. "Eyes fixed in a piercing squint ... his was a mien that made an easy target for political cartoonists" (Nick Kotz).

[Alteration (influenced by French mine, appearance) of Middle English demeine, demeanor, from Old French, from demener, to behave; see demean1.]

mien

(miːn)
n
literary a person's manner, bearing, or appearance, expressing personality or mood: a noble mien.
[C16: probably variant of obsolete demean appearance; related to French mine aspect]

mien

(min)

n.
air, bearing, or demeanor, as showing character, feeling, etc.: a person of noble mien.
[1505–15; probably aph. variant of demean2; spelled with -ie- to distinguish it from mean2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mien - dignified manner or conductmien - dignified manner or conduct    
personal manner, manner - a way of acting or behaving
gravitas, lordliness, dignity - formality in bearing and appearance; "he behaved with great dignity"

mien

noun demeanour, look, air, bearing, appearance, aspect, presence, manner, carriage, aura, countenance, deportment his mild manner and aristocratic mien

mien

noun
1. Behavior through which one reveals one's personality:
Archaic: port.
2. The way something or someone looks:
Translations

mien

[miːn] N (liter) → aire m, porte m, semblante m

mien

n (liter)Miene f

mien

[miːn] n (liter) → contegno
References in classic literature ?
The words were barely uttered, when he encountered a savage of gigantic stature, of the fiercest mien.
Velvet garments sombre but rich, stiffly plaited ruffs and bands, embroidered gloves, venerable beards, the mien and countenance of authority, made it easy to distinguish the gentleman of worship, at that period, from the tradesman, with his plodding air, or the laborer, in his leathern jerkin, stealing awe-stricken into the house which he had perhaps helped to build.
Had there been a Papist among the crowd of Puritans, he might have seen in this beautiful woman, so picturesque in her attire and mien, and with the infant at her bosom, an object to remind him of the image of Divine Maternity, which so many illustrious painters have vied with one another to represent; something which should remind him, indeed, but only by contrast, of that sacred image of sinless motherhood, whose infant was to redeem the world.
Walters was very earnest of mien, and very sincere and honest at heart; and he held sacred things and places in such reverence, and so separated them from worldly matters, that unconsciously to himself his Sunday-school voice had acquired a peculiar intonation which was wholly absent on week-days.
Miss Temple had always something of serenity in her air, of state in her mien, of refined propriety in her language, which precluded deviation into the ardent, the excited, the eager: something which chastened the pleasure of those who looked on her and listened to her, by a controlling sense of awe; and such was my feeling now: but as to Helen Burns, I was struck with wonder.
This glowing description, however, must be lowered or heightened in tone by the association of these characteristics with an undefinable simplicity of mien, a certain slight rusticity of effect.
In the midst was seen A lady of a more majestic mien, By stature and by beauty mark'd their sovereign Queen.
The scatterbrain that gave La Mancha more Rich spoils than Jason's; who a point so keen Had to his wit, and happier far had been If his wit's weathercock a blunter bore; The arm renowned far as Gaeta's shore, Cathay, and all the lands that lie between; The muse discreet and terrible in mien As ever wrote on brass in days of yore; He who surpassed the Amadises all, And who as naught the Galaors accounted, Supported by his love and gallantry: Who made the Belianises sing small, And sought renown on Rocinante mounted; Here, underneath this cold stone, doth he lie.
The middle one of the three windows was half-way open; and sitting close beside it, taking the air with an infinite sadness of mien, like some disconsolate prisoner, Utterson saw Dr.
When we love, by some noble method of our own or some nobility of mien or nature in the other, we apprehend the loved one by what is noblest in ourselves.
A man was introduced of simple mien, who had the appearance of a tradesman.
Then Minerva came up to him disguised as a young shepherd of delicate and princely mien, with a good cloak folded double about her shoulders; she had sandals on her comely feet and held a javelin in her hand.