milling


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Related to milling: milling machine, milling around

mill·ing

 (mĭl′ĭng)
n.
1. The act or process of grinding, especially grinding grain into flour or meal.
2. The operation of cutting, shaping, finishing, or working products manufactured in a mill.
3. The ridges cut on the edges of coins.

milling

(ˈmɪlɪŋ)
n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) the act or process of grinding, cutting, pressing, or crushing in a mill
2. the vertical grooves or fluting on the edge of a coin, etc
3. (Agriculture) (in W North America) a method of halting a stampede of cattle by turning the leaders in a wide arc until the herd turns in upon itself in a tightening spiral
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.milling - corrugated edge of a coinmilling - corrugated edge of a coin    
edge - a sharp side formed by the intersection of two surfaces of an object; "he rounded the edges of the box"
Translations

milling

[ˈmɪlɪŋ]
A. N
1. (= grinding) → molienda f
2. (on coin) → cordoncillo m
B. CPD milling machine Nfresadora f

milling

[ˈmɪlɪŋ] adj the milling crowdla folla in movimento
References in classic literature ?
Well, one day we lowered for a pod of four or five whales, and my boat fastened to one of them; a regular circus horse he was, too, that went milling and milling round so, that my boat's crew could only trim dish, by sitting all their sterns on the outer gunwale.
The deer and the pig and the nilghai were milling round and round in a circle of eight or ten miles radius, while the Eaters of Flesh skirmished round its edge.
Turveydrop was in bed, I found, and Caddy was milling his chocolate, which a melancholy little boy who was an apprentice --it seemed such a curious thing to be apprenticed to the trade of dancing--was waiting to carry upstairs.
My father and his brothers had long dreamed of a sort of family colony somewhere in the country, and now the uncle who was most prosperous bought a milling property on a river not far from Dayton, and my father went out to take charge of it until the others could shape their business to follow him.
They stood stupidly at first and then commenced milling around until six of their number lay dead or dying about them; then with a chorus of grunts and squeals they started off at a wild run, disappearing quickly in the dense underbrush.