mimetic


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Related to mimetic: mimetic desire

mi·met·ic

 (mĭ-mĕt′ĭk, mī-)
adj.
1. Relating to, characteristic of, or exhibiting mimicry.
2.
a. Of or relating to an imitation; imitative.
b. Using imitative means of representation: a mimetic dance.

[Greek mīmētikos, from mīmēsis, mimicry; see mimesis.]

mi·met′i·cal·ly adv.

mimetic

(mɪˈmɛtɪk) or

mimetical

adj
1. of, resembling, or relating to mimesis or imitation, as in art, etc
2. (Biology) biology of or exhibiting mimicry
miˈmetically adv

mi•met•ic

(mɪˈmɛt ɪk, maɪ-)

adj.
characterized by, exhibiting, or of the nature of mimicry: mimetic gestures.
[1625–35; < Greek mīmētikós imitative =mīmē- (see mimesis) + -tikos -tic]
mi•met′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.mimetic - characterized by or of the nature of or using mimesismimetic - characterized by or of the nature of or using mimesis; "a mimetic dance"; "the mimetic presentation of images"
representational - (used especially of art) depicting objects, figures,or scenes as seen; "representational art"; "representational images"
2.mimetic - exhibiting mimicrymimetic - exhibiting mimicry; "mimetic coloring of a butterfly"; "the mimetic tendency of infancy"- R.W.Hamilton
imitative - marked by or given to imitation; "acting is an imitative art"; "man is an imitative being"
Translations

mimetic

[mɪˈmetɪk] ADJ (frm) [dance] → mimético; [theatre] → de mimo; [re-enactment] → mímico

mimetic

[mɪˈmɛtɪk] adjmimétique

mi·met·ic

a. mimético-a, que imita.
References in classic literature ?
This and similar illustrations or explanations are put forth, not for their own sake, or as an exposition of Plato's theory of ideas, but with a view of showing that poetry and the mimetic arts are concerned with an inferior part of the soul and a lower kind of knowledge.
In saying this, I intended to imply that we must come to an understanding about the mimetic art,--whether the poets, in narrating their stories, are to be allowed by us to imitate, and if so, whether in whole or in part, and if the latter, in what parts; or should all imitation be prohibited?
Modernity has, in effect, caused people to fall into the trap of thinking that one can do what one pleases, despite the fact that the trappings of modern culture cause us to fall farther and farther down the rabbit hole of mimetic desire.
Synopsis: War, violence, and the disruption of social orders are critical areas of focus in mimetic theory, and a mimetic perspective applied to the study of politics illuminates social processes and phenomena over and beyond typical explanations offered by mainstream political science.
This revised dissertation examines the status of the victim in the work of Rene Girard and Raymund Schwager, the Innsbruck theologian most responsible for bringing mimetic theory into Catholic theology.
Intimate Domain: Desire, Trauma, and Mimetic Theory uses Rene Girard's neglected early work on sensory experience and blends literary criticism with a healthy dose of psychology in considering mimetic theory.
He is the author of nearly thirty books (see below), in which he developed the ideas of: mimetic desire: all of our desires are borrowed from other people; mimetic rivalry: all conflict originates in mimetic desire; the scapegoat mechanism is the origin of sacrifice and the foundation of human culture, and religion was necessary in human evolution to control the violence that can come from mimetic rivalry; the Bible reveals the three previous ideas and denounces the scapegoat mechanism.
The phantom of the ego; modernism and the mimetic unconscious.
1) Answering the objection of Marxist critic Lucien Goldman to this thesis, Girard insists that the great writer's disavowal of the mimetic desire that has enslaved him to his models always gains symbolic expression in the novel's conclusion through some sort of death and rising, (2) even when "the resort to Christian symbolism .
He is the author of nearly thirty books, in which he developed the ideas of mimetic desire (all of our desires are borrowed from other people) and mimetic rivalry (all conflict originates in mimetic desire).
Known as a "supergene", this clustering allows genetic combinations that are favoured for their mimetic resemblance to be maintained, while preventing combinations that produce non-mimetic patterns from arising.
Rene Girard's work in mimetic theory has found its way into various disciplines--literary studies, anthropology, psychology, theology, and religious studies--no doubt because of the remarkable revelatory power his mimetic theory and scapegoat mechanism have provided for scholars.