mimicry


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Related to mimicry: Batesian mimicry

mim·ic·ry

 (mĭm′ĭ-krē)
n. pl. mim·ic·ries
1.
a. The act, practice, or art of mimicking.
b. An instance of mimicking.
2. Biology The resemblance of one organism to another or to an object in its surroundings for concealment and protection from predators.

mimicry

(ˈmɪmɪkrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. the act or art of copying or imitating closely; mimicking
2. (Zoology) the resemblance shown by one animal species, esp an insect, to another, which protects it from predators

mim•ic•ry

(ˈmɪm ɪk ri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. the act, practice, or art of mimicking.
2. the close resemblance of an organism to a different organism, such that it benefits from the mistaken identity, as in seeming to be unpalatable.
3. an instance or result of mimicking.

mim·ic·ry

(mĭm′ĭ-krē)
The resemblance of one organism to another or to an object in its surroundings for concealment or protection from predators.
Did You Know? For many organisms, the chances of survival are improved because they have evolved to imitate the looks, sounds, actions, or other characteristics of different organisms. Mimicry, the name for this imitation of one species by another, is especially common among insects. In one classic example, the viceroy butterfly is protected from being eaten by birds because its wing markings resemble the striking orange and black markings of the monarch butterfly. The monarch is a dangerous dinner for birds; it contains chemicals that make them so sick that they vomit and their hearts beat dangerously fast. The viceroy, on the other hand, makes a tasty meal, but because it looks like the monarch, birds tend to avoid it. Mimicry also can help a predator catch prey: some ant-eating spiders, for example, look like the ants they eat. Thus disguised, they have an easy time catching unsuspecting ants.

mimicry

the ability of some creatures to imitate others, either by sound or appearance, or to merge with their environment for protective purposes. See also performing. — mimic, mimical, adj.
See also: Biology
the art or practice of copying or imitating closely, especially by a person for the purpose of entertainment. See also biology. — mimic, mimical, adj.
See also: Performing

mimicry

The adoption by one species of the structure or behavior of another to gain protection.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mimicry - the act of mimickingmimicry - the act of mimicking; imitative behavior
personation, impersonation - imitating the mannerisms of another person
parody, mockery, takeoff - humorous or satirical mimicry
2.mimicry - the resemblance of an animal species to another species or to natural objectsmimicry - the resemblance of an animal species to another species or to natural objects; provides concealment and protection from predators
imitation - copying (or trying to copy) the actions of someone else

mimicry

noun imitation, impression, impersonation, copying, imitating, mimicking, parody, caricature, mockery, burlesque, apery One of his strengths was his skill at mimicry.

mimicry

noun
The act, practice, or art of copying the manner or expression of another:
Translations
تَقْليد، مُحاكاه
mimikry
efterligningparodi
mimikri
eftirhermur, skopstæling
mimikry
taklitçilik

mimicry

[ˈmɪmɪkrɪ] Nmímica f (Bio) → mimetismo m

mimicry

[ˈmɪmɪkri] n
[person] → imitation f
(ZOOLOGY) (by animal, plant)mimétisme m

mimicry

nNachahmung f; (Biol) → Mimikry f; protective mimicrySchutzfärbung f, → Tarnfarbe f; his talent for mimicrysein Talent dafür, andere nachzuahmen

mimicry

[ˈmɪmɪkrɪ] nimitazioni fpl (Zool) → mimetismo

mimic

(ˈmimik) past tense, past participle ˈmimicked verb
to imitate (someone or something), especially with the intention of making him or it appear ridiculous or funny. The comedian mimicked the Prime Minister's way of speaking.
noun
a person who mimics. Children are often good mimics.
ˈmimicry noun
References in classic literature ?
Her talent for every species of drollery, grimace, and mimicry,--for dancing, tumbling, climbing, singing, whistling, imitating every sound that hit her fancy,--seemed inexhaustible.
Those habits of mimicry are growing on her; and she speaks to you with a levity which it is positively shocking to hear.
We go cautiously for a lifetime, and then, just for an instant, we forget, and--" he ground his teeth in mimicry of the crunching of great jaws in flesh.
With his marvellous and vivid personality, with a style that has really a true colour-element in it, with his extraordinary power, not over mere mimicry but over imaginative and intellectual creation, Mr Irving, had his sole object been to give the public what they wanted, could have produced the commonest plays in the commonest manner, and made as much success and money as a man could possibly desire.
A third, with a gift for singing and mimicry, who had achieved success at the smoking concerts of the Medical School by his imitation of notorious comedians, had abandoned the hospital for the chorus of a musical comedy.
Ups and downs, generosity, dark fates, the most delicate goodness, have nowhere been more prominent than in the private existence of those devoted to the public mimicry of men and women.
The wearing of the Arab burnoose which Tarzan had placed upon his person had aroused in the mind of the anthropoid a desire for similar mimicry of the Tarmangani.
Halting beneath this outer gate, the youth winded the horn which hung at his side in mimicry of the custom of the times.
His seeming rescue by a votaress of the high priestess of the sun had been but a part of the mimicry of their heathen ceremony--the sun looking down upon him through the opening at the top of the court had claimed him as his own, and the priestess had come from the inner temple to save him from the polluting hands of worldlings--to save him as a human offering to their flaming deity.
All savages appear to possess, to an uncommon degree, this power of mimicry.
The young apes refought the battle in mimicry of their mighty elders.
From the date of their conversation after the party at Princess Tverskaya's he had never spoken again to Anna of his suspicions and his jealousies, and that habitual tone of his bantering mimicry was the most convenient tone possible for his present attitude to his wife.