mine


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mine 1

 (mīn)
n.
1.
a. A hole or tunnel dug into the earth from which ore or minerals are extracted.
b. A surface excavation where the topmost or exposed layer of earth is removed for extracting its ore or minerals.
c. The site of such a hole, tunnel, or excavation, including its surface buildings and equipment.
2. A deposit of ore or minerals in the earth or on its surface.
3. An abundant supply or source of something valuable: This guidebook is a mine of information.
4.
a. A tunnel dug under an enemy emplacement to destroy it by explosives, cause it to collapse, or gain access to it for an attack.
b. An explosive device used to destroy enemy personnel, shipping, fortifications, or equipment, often placed in a concealed position and designed to be detonated by contact, proximity, or a time fuse.
5. A burrow or tunnel made by an insect, especially one made in a leaf by a leaf miner.
v. mined, min·ing, mines
v.tr.
1.
a. To extract (ore or minerals) from the earth.
b. To dig a mine in (the earth) to obtain ore or minerals.
2.
a. To tunnel under (the earth or a surface feature).
b. To make (a tunnel) by digging.
3. To lay explosive mines in or under.
4. To attack, damage, or destroy by underhand means; subvert.
5. To delve into and make use of; exploit: mine the archives for detailed information.
v.intr.
1.
a. To excavate the earth for the purpose of extracting ore or minerals.
b. To work in a mine.
2. To dig a tunnel under the earth, especially under an enemy emplacement or fortification.
3. To lay explosive mines.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *mīna, probably of Celtic origin.]

mine 2

 (mīn)
pron. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
Used to indicate the one or ones belonging to me: The green gloves are mine. If you can't find your hat, take mine.
adj. A possessive form of I1. Archaic
Used instead of my before an initial vowel or the letter h.

[Middle English, from Old English mīn; see me- in Indo-European roots.]
Our Living Language In Standard English, most possessive pronouns have different forms when used as nouns, or nominals, as in That book is yours, than when used as adjectives, as in That is your book. The two exceptions are his and its, which retain the same form in both usages. The nominal forms all end in -s except for mine. In some Southern US and New England vernacular dialects, all nominal possessive pronouns end in -n, just like mine, as in That book is hern (but not "That's hern book") and Those cookies are ourn. Although forms such as hisn and hern are highly socially stigmatized, from a strictly linguistic standpoint these forms reflect a natural phenomenon in the development of all languages and dialects: Irregular patterns tend to be regularized, thereby eliminating exceptions to language "rules." Further, hisn, hern, ourn, yourn, and theirn have a long history in English. They arose in the Middle English period (c. 1100-1500) by analogy with mine and thine, forms that are older than my and thy and that can be traced to Old English (c. 449-1100). Originally, my and thy were used before nouns beginning with consonant sounds, as in my book, while mine and thine were used before nouns beginning with vowel sounds, as in mine eyes—as a and an still are. This distinction persisted into the 1700s. But as nominal pronouns, mine and thine remained unchanged. This invariant use of -n led to its use for all nominal possessive pronouns (except its, which is rarely used nominally, as in That book is its). In fact, these -n forms may be older than the current standard -s forms, which arose late in the Middle English period, by analogy to his. Most likely, hern, ourn, yourn, and theirn originated somewhere in the central area of southern England, since they can still be found throughout many parts of that region. In the United States, the forms appear to be increasingly confined to older speakers in relatively isolated areas, indicating that these features are at last fading from use. In some Southern-based vernacular dialects, particularly African American Vernacular English, the irregular standard English pattern for nominal possessive forms has been regularized by adding -s to mine, as in That book is mines. See Note at an1.

mine

(maɪn)
pron
1. something or someone belonging to or associated with me: mine is best.
2. of mine belonging to or associated with me
determiner
(preceding a vowel) an archaic word for my1: mine eyes; mine host.
[Old English mīn; compare Old High German, Old Norse mīn, Dutch mijn]

mine

(maɪn)
n
1. (Mining & Quarrying) a system of excavations made for the extraction of minerals, esp coal, ores, or precious stones
2. (Mining & Quarrying) any deposit of ore or minerals
3. a lucrative source or abundant supply: she was a mine of information.
4. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a device containing an explosive designed to destroy ships, vehicles, or personnel, usually laid beneath the ground or in water
5. (Military) a tunnel or sap dug to undermine a fortification
6. (Botany) a groove or tunnel made by certain insects, esp in a leaf
vb
7. (Mining & Quarrying) to dig into (the earth) for (minerals)
8. to make (a hole, tunnel, etc) by digging or boring
9. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) to place explosive mines in position below the surface of (the sea or land)
10. (Military) to undermine (a fortification) by digging mines or saps
11. another word for undermine
[C13: from Old French, probably of Celtic origin; compare Irish mein, Welsh mwyn ore, mine]
ˈminable, ˈmineable adj

mine1

(maɪn)

pron.
1. a form of the possessive case of I used as a predicate adjective: The yellow sweater is mine.
2. that or those belonging to me: Mine is on the left.
3. Archaic. my (used before a word beginning with a vowel or a silent h, or following a noun): mine eyes; lady mine.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English mīn my; c. Old Frisian, Old Saxon, Old High German mīn]

mine2

(maɪn)

n., v. mined, min•ing. n.
1. an excavation made in the earth for the purpose of extracting mineral substances, as ore, coal, or precious stones.
2. a natural deposit of such substances.
3. an abundant source; store: a mine of information.
4. an explosive device floating on or moored just below the surface of the water, used for blowing up an enemy ship that strikes it or passes close by it.
5. a similar device used on land against personnel or vehicles; land mine.
6. an underground passage dug under an enemy's position so as to deposit explosives that will blow up the position.
7. a passageway in the tissue of a leaf, made by certain insects.
v.i.
8. to dig in the earth for the purpose of extracting a mineral substance; make a mine.
9. to extract a mineral substance from a mine.
10. to make subterranean passages.
11. to place or lay mines, as in military or naval operations.
v.t.
12. to dig in (earth) in order to extract a mineral substance.
13. to extract (a mineral substance) from a mine.
14. to use for extracting useful or valuable material from: to mine every reference book available.
15. to use, esp. a natural resource: to mine the nation's forests.
16. to make subterranean passages in or under; burrow.
17. to make, as a passage or tunnel, by digging or burrowing.
18. to dig away or remove the foundations of.
19. to place or lay military or naval mines under.
20. to remove (a natural resource) from its source without attempting to replenish it.
[1275–1325; (v.) Middle English < Old French miner < Vulgar Latin *mīnāre, probably < a Celtic base *mein-; (n.) Middle English < Middle French, perhaps n. derivative of miner; compare Medieval Latin mina mine, mineral]

mine

1. In land mine warfare, an explosive or material, normally encased, designed to destroy or damage ground vehicles, boats, or aircraft, or designed to wound, kill, or otherwise incapacitate personnel. It may be detonated by the action of its victim, by the passage of time, or by controlled means.
2. In naval mine warfare, an explosive device laid in the water with the intention of damaging or sinking ships or of deterring shipping from entering an area. The term does not include devices attached to the bottoms of ships or to harbor installations by personnel operating underwater, nor does it include devices which explode immediately on expiration of a predetermined time after laying. See also land mine warfare; mine warfare.

Mine

 of egoists—Madden.

mine


Past participle: mined
Gerund: mining

Imperative
mine
mine
Present
I mine
you mine
he/she/it mines
we mine
you mine
they mine
Preterite
I mined
you mined
he/she/it mined
we mined
you mined
they mined
Present Continuous
I am mining
you are mining
he/she/it is mining
we are mining
you are mining
they are mining
Present Perfect
I have mined
you have mined
he/she/it has mined
we have mined
you have mined
they have mined
Past Continuous
I was mining
you were mining
he/she/it was mining
we were mining
you were mining
they were mining
Past Perfect
I had mined
you had mined
he/she/it had mined
we had mined
you had mined
they had mined
Future
I will mine
you will mine
he/she/it will mine
we will mine
you will mine
they will mine
Future Perfect
I will have mined
you will have mined
he/she/it will have mined
we will have mined
you will have mined
they will have mined
Future Continuous
I will be mining
you will be mining
he/she/it will be mining
we will be mining
you will be mining
they will be mining
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been mining
you have been mining
he/she/it has been mining
we have been mining
you have been mining
they have been mining
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been mining
you will have been mining
he/she/it will have been mining
we will have been mining
you will have been mining
they will have been mining
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been mining
you had been mining
he/she/it had been mining
we had been mining
you had been mining
they had been mining
Conditional
I would mine
you would mine
he/she/it would mine
we would mine
you would mine
they would mine
Past Conditional
I would have mined
you would have mined
he/she/it would have mined
we would have mined
you would have mined
they would have mined
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mine - excavation in the earth from which ores and minerals are extractedmine - excavation in the earth from which ores and minerals are extracted
adit - a nearly horizontal passage from the surface into a mine
coal mine, coalpit - a mine where coal is dug from the ground
colliery, pit - a workplace consisting of a coal mine plus all the buildings and equipment connected with it
copper mine - a mine where copper is dug from the ground
excavation - a hole in the ground made by excavating
gold mine, goldmine - a mine where gold ore is found
mineshaft - excavation consisting of a vertical or sloping passageway for finding or mining ore or for ventilating a mine
salt mine - a mine where salt is dug
shaft - a long vertical passage sunk into the earth, as for a mine or tunnel
silver mine - a mine where silver ore is dug
strip mine - an open mine (usually for coal) where the seams run close to the surface
sulfur mine, sulphur mine - a mine where sulphur is dug from the ground
2.mine - explosive device that explodes on contactmine - explosive device that explodes on contact; designed to destroy vehicles or ships or to kill or maim personnel
explosive device - device that bursts with sudden violence from internal energy
floating mine, marine mine - an explosive mine designed to destroy ships that bump into it
booby trap, ground-emplaced mine, land mine - an explosive mine hidden underground; explodes when stepped on or driven over
Verb1.mine - get from the earth by excavation; "mine ores and metals"
mining, excavation - the act of extracting ores or coal etc from the earth
strip mine, surface mine, surface-mine - extract (ore) from a strip-mine
exploit, tap - draw from; make good use of; "we must exploit the resources we are given wisely"
2.mine - lay mines; "The Vietnamese mined Cambodia"
reenforce, reinforce - make stronger; "he reinforced the concrete"
countermine - destroy enemy mines with one's own mines; "We countermined the banks of the river"

mine

noun
1. pit, deposit, shaft, vein, colliery, excavation, coalfield, lode an explosion at a coal mine
2. source, store, fund, stock, supply, reserve, treasury, wealth, abundance, hoard a mine of information
verb
1. dig up, extract, quarry, unearth, delve, excavate, hew, dig for Not enough coal to be mined economically
2. lay mines in or under, sow with mines The approaches to the garrison have been heavily mined.
Translations
خاصَّتيلُغْممَلِكِيٌّمَنْجَممَنْجِمٌ
мина
důlmůjzaminovatminadolovat
minmineminereminespringemit
miin
kaivosminunmunsuihkukäytävä
mojrudnik
bányaenyém
tambang
koma fyrir tundurduflum/jarîsprengjumminnnámasprengja upp meî tundurduflum/sprengjumtundurdufl; jarîsprengja
鉱山私のもの
광산내 것
mano
manamanasmanimansmans, manējs
mínazamínovaťzasiahnuť mínou
minamojrudnikmojamoje
minminamineramittgruva
เหมืองแร่ของฉัน
của tôimỏ

mine

1 [maɪn] POSS PRON (referring to singular possession) → (el/la) mío/a; (referring to plural possession) → (los/las) míos/as
that car is mineese coche es mío
is this glass mine?¿es mío este vaso?, ¿este vaso es mío?
a friend of mineun amigo mío
"is this your coat?" - "no, mine is black"-¿es éste tu abrigo? -no, el mío es negro
which is mine?¿cuál es el mío?
your parents and minetus padres y los míos
I think that brother of mine is responsiblecreo que mi hermano es el que tiene la culpa, creo que el responsable es mi hermano
be mine! (o.f., also hum) → ¡cásate conmigo!
the house became minela casa pasó a ser mía or de mi propiedad
it's no business of mineno es asunto mío, no tiene que ver conmigo
I want to make her minequiero que sea mi mujer
mine and thinelo mío y lo tuyo
what's mine is yourstodo lo mío es tuyo (también)

mine

2 [maɪn]
A. N
1.mina f
a coal mineuna mina de carbón
to work down the minetrabajar en la mina
see also diamond B
see also gold C
see also salt D
2. (Mil, Naut etc) → mina f
to lay minesponer minas
to sweep minesdragar or barrer minas
3. (fig) the book is a mine of informationeste libro es una mina de información
see also useless 2
B. VT
1. [+ minerals, coal] → extraer; [+ area] → explotar
2. (Mil, Naut) → minar, poner minas en
C. VIextraer mineral
to mine for sthabrir una mina para extraer algo
D. CPD mine detector Ndetector m de minas

mine

[ˈmaɪn]
pronle mien(la)(ne) → les miens(miennes)
Is this your coat? - No, mine's black → C'est ton manteau? - Non, le mien est noir.
Is this your car? - No, mine's green → C'est ta voiture? - Non, la mienne est verte.
her parents and mine → ses parents et les miens
Your hands are dirty, mine are clean → Tes mains sont sales, les miennes sont propres.
it's mine → c'est à moi
This book is mine → Ce livre est à moi.
Whose is this? - It's mine → C'est à qui? - À moi.
n
(= pit) → mine f coal mine
a mine of information → une mine de renseignements
(= bomb) → mine f landmine
vt
[+ coal] → extraire
[+ ship, beach, area] → minermine detector ndétecteur m de mines

mine

:
mine detector
mine disaster
minefield
nMinenfeld nt; to enter a (political) minesich auf (politisch) gefährliches Terrain begeben; it’s an absolute mine!das ist Sprengstoff!
mine gas
nGrubengas nt, → schlagende Wetter pl
minehunter
nMinensuchboot nt
minelayer
nMinenleger m

mine

:
minesweeper
nMinenräumboot ntor -suchboot ntor -sucher m
mine workings
plStollen pl

mine

1
poss pronmeine(r, s); this car is minedas ist MEIN Auto, dieses Auto gehört mir; is this mine?gehört das mir?, ist das meine(r, s)?; his friends and mineseine und meine Freunde; a friend of mineein Freund von mir; will you be mine? (old)willst du die Meine werden? (old); mine is a rather different jobmeine Arbeit ist ziemlich anders; no advice of mine could …keiner meiner Ratschläge konnte …; a favourite (Brit) or favorite (US) expression of mineeiner meiner Lieblingsausdrücke
adj (obs)mein(e)

mine

2
n
(Min) → Bergwerk nt; (= gold mine, silver mine)Bergwerk nt, → Mine f; (= coal mine)Zeche f, → Bergwerk nt; to work down the minesunter Tage arbeiten
(Mil, Naut etc) → Mine f; to lay minesMinen legen
(fig) the book is a mine of informationdas Buch ist eine wahre Fundgrube; he is a mine of informationer ist ein wandelndes Lexikon (inf); he’s a mine of information about historyer besitzt ein schier unerschöpfliches Geschichtswissen
vt
coal, metalfördern, abbauen; areaBergbau betreiben or Bodenschätze abbauen in (+dat)
(Mil, Naut) channel, roadverminen; (= blow up)(mit einer Mine) sprengen
viBergbau betreiben; to mine for somethingnach etw graben; they mined deep down into the mountainsie trieben einen Stollen bis tief in den Berg hinein

mine

1 [maɪn] poss pronil/la mio/a pli/le miei/mie
a friend of mine → un mio amico
his is red, mine is green → il suo è rosso, il mio è verde
this is mine → questo è (il) mio
this book is mine → questo libro è mio

mine

2 [maɪn]
1. n
a. (pit) → miniera
to work down the mines → lavorare in miniera
a mine of information (fig) → una miniera di informazioni
b. (explosive) → mina
to lay mines → posare delle mine
2. vt
a. (coal, metal) → estrarre
b. (Mil, Naut) → minare
3. vifare degli scavi minerari
to mine for sth → estrarre qc

mine1

(main) pronoun
something which belongs to me. Are these pencils yours or mine? He is a friend of mine (= one of my friends).

mine: This pencil isn't yours — it's mine (not my one).

mine2

(main) noun
1. a place (usually underground) from which metals, coal, salt etc are dug. a coalmine; My father worked in the mines.
2. a type of bomb used underwater or placed just beneath the surface of the ground. The ship has been blown up by a mine.
verb
1. to dig (for metals etc) in a mine. Coal is mined near here.
2. to place explosive mines in. They've mined the mouth of the river.
3. to blow up with mines. His ship was mined.
ˈminer noun
a person who works in a mine, in Britain usually a coalminer.
ˈmining noun
ˈminefield noun
an area of ground or water which is full of explosive mines.

mine

مَلِكِيٌّ, مَنْجِمٌ důl, můj min, mine Bergwerk, mein δικός μου, ορυχείο mina, mío kaivos, minun mien (le), mine moj, rudnik miniera, mio 私のもの, 鉱山 광산, 내 것 mijn gruve, min kopalnia, mój meu, mina мой, рудник min, mina เหมืองแร่, ของฉัน benim, maden ocağı của tôi, mỏ 我的,
References in classic literature ?
I planned to spend mine in new music," said Beth, with a little sigh, which no one heard but the hearth brush and kettle holder.
Finding that Val Jacinto was regularly engaged in the business of taking explorers and mine prospectors into the interior, Professor Bumper had engaged the man.
I had to confess that mine had not gone beyond a few straggling notes.
The house, the money that provides for it, are not mine.
And when people say that's the accomplished daughter o' the accomplished superintendent of the Devil's Ford claim--otherwise known as the Star-eyed Goddess o' Devil's Ford-- every eye is fixed on the mine, and Capital, so to speak, tumbles to her.
The child is yours -- she is none of mine -- neither will she recognise my voice or aspect as a father's.
There are wives who forsake their husbands and--and go off with a handsomer man, as the poet says; and mine, mine, alas
I have been attending to mine own business,'' answered De Bracy calmly, ``as you, Fitzurse, have been minding yours.
Every loom From Milan down to Sicily shall be mine, And mine the pearls that the Arabian seas Store in their silent caverns.
I have the best reasons for believing that both Mohegan and the Leather-Stocking have been privy to the existence of a mine in this very mountain for many years.
For I have revell'd, when the sun was bright In the summer sky; in dreamy fields of light, And left unheedingly my very heart In climes of mine imagining - apart From mine own home, with beings that have been Of mine own thought - what more could I have seen?
But admitting that it is most advantageous for a city to be one as much as possible, it does not seem to follow that this will take place by permitting all at once to say this is mine, and this is not mine