mingy


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min·gy

 (mĭn′jē)
adj. min·gi·er, min·gi·est Informal
1. Small in quantity; meager: a job that paid mingy wages.
2. Mean and stingy.

[Perhaps from m(ean) + (st)ingy.]

mingy

(ˈmɪndʒɪ)
adj, -gier or -giest
informal Brit miserly, stingy, or niggardly
[C20: probably a blend of mean2 + stingy1]

min•gy

(ˈmɪn dʒi)

adj. -gi•er, -gi•est.
stingy; niggardly.
[1885–90; m(ean2) + (st)ingy1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.mingy - (used of persons or behavior) characterized by or indicative of lack of generosity; "a mean person"; "he left a miserly tip"
stingy, ungenerous - unwilling to spend; "she practices economy without being stingy"; "an ungenerous response to the appeal for funds"
Translations

mingy

[ˈmɪndʒɪ] ADJ (mingier (compar) (mingiest (superl))) [person] → tacaño; [amount, portion] → mísero, miserable

mingy

[ˈmɪndʒi] adj
[person] → radin(e)
[amount, helping] → maigre

mingy

adj (+er) (Brit inf) → knickerig (inf); amountlumpig (inf), → mickerig (inf)

mingy

[ˈmɪndʒɪ] adj (Brit) (fam) (person) → tirchio/a, spilorcio/a; (share, portion, amount) → misero/a, scarso/a
References in periodicals archive ?
The fashion designer went all-out in a pair of tight gold trousers, shiny boots and a metallic jacket - and the overall effect was mingy rather than blingy.
At the same time, returns on many fixed-income investments, which traditionally make up a larger share of portfolios as one ages, are mingy because of historically low interest rates and bond yields.
Her life was her family and her 2 beautiful granddaughters, her 2 cats Mingy Moo and Gizmo and her lovely garden.
You hear plenty of complaints about the president's mingy care and feeding of donors.
The base was a bit mingy with the biscuit and the cheesecake part had a texture which I wasn't so fond of, but after such a gorgeous meal, I really couldn't complain of faltering at that last hurdle.
Ensconced in the chambers of the Lord Commander of the Kingsguard, poring over the White Book which records the "name and deeds" of every knight who ever served (SoS 751), to find his own life "a rather scant and mingy thing" (SoS 753), he reflects that "[t]he world was simpler in those days [.
In Our Mutual Friend, written 27 years later, the old and destitute Betty Higden, who had been more than a mother to orphans and cast-off children, takes to vagabondage rather than seek sheker in a workhouse, preferring to die on her own terms, refusing the state's mingy solicitude.
And while England, in the words of Robert Hughes, the critic, is "a nation always mingy in valuing its own artists", it gave space and inspiration to Freud.
In a sense, Wolfe did not even belong to the mountains, in which he felt prison-pent, an exile even in his mother's house, nor did he feel that he belonged to his family--the monumental father, the mingy mother, the brood of siblings--nor really to the many cities out yonder, nor to the women in them, whom he never really understood.