minischool


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min·i·school

 (mĭn′ē-sko͞ol′)
n.
1. An alternative school offering specialized or one-on-one instruction.
2. A small school serving as an addition to or an extension of a larger one.

minischool

(ˈmɪnɪˌskuːl)
n
(Education) a school at which pupils are taught through one-to-one tuition
References in periodicals archive ?
Trumpeted as "the next big thing" in The New York Times, (3) this minischool proceeds from premises laid out by evolutionary psychology and sociobiology, and is often, though by no means always, hostile to the last four decades of literary theory.
He also offers a minischool for adults and kids to learn what it's like to work on a racing team.
8 Teachers in minischool grade-level teams constructed interdisciplinary "learning goals" to guide the ways they considered student work.
Even while gangs of attaches roamed Cite Soleil, ruthlessly ridding it of all public mention of the exiled president, Bohnen maintained a large banner over one minischool that said, "Father Aristide, Old Grad.
There's a rotting plank, which spans a ditch oozing with industrial and human waste and leads to one of his minischools.
There is no shortage of volunteers for the minischool from any of the achievement levels found in the school.
Students in the computer minischool consistently outscore students in the rest of the school on achievement tests given by the city, a fact that has guaranteed district support for the experiment into its third year.
In such places, choice can entail very long bus rides or bizarre efforts to subdivide a school with a half-dozen teachers into three different minischools.
The study reveals that: (1) 53 percent of all New York City elementary school buildings and annexes are overcrowded and continue to operate at 99 percent or greater capacity; (2) in 10 school districts, 70 percent or more of elementary school buildings are operating at 99 percent or greater capacity; (3) minischools and transportables, both ways to quickly increase capacity, are also overcrowded; and (4) over the last year, New York City collected less than 31 percent of the state's reimbursable school building aid despite enrolling almost 40 percent of the state's students.
To accommodate the growing numbers of students, the district has converted some traditional elementary schools to year-round calendars, reopened others and built new primary centers, minischools for kindergarten through second grade.
47] Norfolk even built six minischools, with five rooms each, to ensure the single-race composition of their attendance zones.
It is shifting its middle or junior high schools from large schools (typical of New York and other cities), with a thousand or more children, into minischools or alternative schools, with at most a few hundred children.