minnow


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min·now

 (mĭn′ō)
n. pl. minnow or min·nows
1. Any of a large group of small freshwater fishes of the family Cyprinidae, widely used as live bait.
2. Any of various other small, often silver-colored fishes.

[Middle English meneu; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

minnow

(ˈmɪnəʊ)
n, pl -nows or -now
1. (Animals) a small slender European freshwater cyprinid fish, Phoxinus phoxinus
2. (Animals) any other small cyprinid
3. (Angling) angling a spinning lure imitating a minnow
4. a small or insignificant person
[C15: related to Old English myne minnow; compare Old High German muniwa fish]

min•now

(ˈmɪn oʊ)

n., pl. (esp. for kinds or species) -nows, (esp. collectively, Rare) -now.
1. a small, European cyprinoid fish, Phoxinus phoxinus.
2. any fish of the family Cyprinidae, characterized by jaws without teeth and smooth overlapping scales and including the carps, goldfishes, and daces.
[1325–75; Middle English minwe, Old English *mynwe (feminine) for myne (masculine); c. Old High German munewa kind of fish]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.minnow - very small European freshwater fish common in gravelly streamsminnow - very small European freshwater fish common in gravelly streams
cyprinid, cyprinid fish - soft-finned mainly freshwater fishes typically having toothless jaws and cycloid scales
Translations
střevle
mutusintti
płotka

minnow

[ˈmɪnəʊ] N (minnow or minnows (pl)) → pececillo m (de agua dulce)

minnow

[ˈmɪnəʊ] n (= small fish) → vairon m

minnow

nElritze f
References in classic literature ?
He looked into every pool of water vainly, until, as the long twilight came on, he discovered a solitary fish, the size of a minnow, in such a pool.
In the middle of the day he found two minnows in a large pool.
In the evening he caught three more minnows, eating two and saving the third for breakfast.
It was because it refused to die that he still ate muskeg berries and minnows, drank his hot water, and kept a wary eye on the sick wolf.
It was indeed a changeful brook; here it would make a pool, dark and brooding and still, where we bent to look at our mirrored faces; then it grew communicative and gossiped shallowly over a broken pebble bed where there was a diamond dance of sunbeams and no troutling or minnow could glide through without being seen.
I WILL get some worms and go fishing and catch a dish of minnows for my dinner," said Mr.
When he was tired he lay face-downward on the grass and watched the eager scurrying of minnows and of tadpoles.
I never knew anybody catch anything, up the Thames, except minnows and dead cats, but that has nothing to do, of course, with fishing
Lying flat on the logs, keeping perfectly quiet, waiting till the minnows came close, we would make swift passes with our hands.
He often would Hurly-burly Get up early And go By hook or crook To the brook, And bring home Miller's Thumb, Tittlebat Not over fat, Minnows small As the stall Of a glove, Not above The size Of a nice Little baby's Little fingers.
He got out the fish lines and showed Saxon how to bait her hooks with salted minnows.
Coming slowly on through the forests of masts was a great steamship, beating the water in short impatient strokes with her heavy paddles as though she wanted room to breathe, and advancing in her huge bulk like a sea monster among the minnows of the Thames.