minster


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Related to minster: monster

min·ster

 (mĭn′stər)
n. Chiefly British
1. A monastery church.
2. A large church, especially a collegiate church or a cathedral.

[Middle English, from Old English mynster, from Vulgar Latin *monistērium, from Late Latin monastērium, monastery; see monastery.]

minster

(ˈmɪnstə)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) Brit any of certain cathedrals and large churches, usually originally connected to a monastery
[Old English mynster, probably from Vulgar Latin monisterium (unattested), variant of Church Latin monastērium monastery]

min•ster

(ˈmɪn stər)

n.
any of certain large or important churches.
[before 900; Old English mynster (c. German Münster) « Late Latin monastērium monastery]

minster

A loose term given to a number of medieval English cathedrals and major churches. It originally implied a monastery and monastic church.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.minster - any of certain cathedrals and large churchesminster - any of certain cathedrals and large churches; originally connected to a monastery
cathedral - any large and important church
monastery - the residence of a religious community
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Translations

minster

[ˈmɪnstəʳ] N (= cathedral) → catedral f; (= church) → iglesia f de un monasterio

minster

[ˈmɪnstər] néglise f abbatiale

minster

nMünster nt

minster

[ˈmɪnstəʳ] n (Brit) → cattedrale f (annessa a monastero)
References in classic literature ?
As the clock of York Minster struck nine, she followed Mrs.
The nuptials of our hero, thus formally approved by his father, were celebrated in the most august of temples, the noble Minster of York.
The Iliad, the Hamlet, the Doric column, the Roman arch, the Gothic minster, the German anthem, when they are ended, the master casts behind him.
Beside it is the minster of the same saint, who hath the town under his very special care.
There was every walk and nook which Alice had made glad; and in the minster nave was one flat stone beneath which she slept in peace.
York Minster was a full-grown, short, thick, powerful man: his disposition was reserved, taciturn, morose, and when excited violently passionate; his affections were very strong towards a few friends on board; his intellect good.
When York Minster afterwards came on shore, they noticed him in the same way, and told him he ought to shave; yet he had not twenty dwarf hairs on his face, whilst we all wore our untrimmed beards.
The man was evidently living by himself, and York Minster said he was "very bad man," and that probably he had stolen something.
The nearest approach to a religious feeling which I heard of, was shown by York Minster, who, when Mr.
On the 11th of January, 1833, by carrying a press of sail, we fetched within a few miles of the great rugged mountain of York Minster (so called by Captain Cook, and the origin of the name of the elder Fuegian), when a violent squall compelled us to shorten sail and stand out to sea.
Bonus Accursius, as early as 1475-1480, printed the collection of these fables, made by Planudes, which, within five years afterwards, Caxton translated into English, and printed at his press in West- minster Abbey, 1485.
On the one hand, he surprised himself by his discoveries in natural history, finding that his piece of garden-ground contained wonderful caterpillars, slugs, and insects, which, so far as he had heard, had never before attracted human observation; and he noticed remarkable coincidences between these zoological phenomena and the great events of that time,--as, for example, that before the burning of York Minster there had been mysterious serpentine marks on the leaves of the rose-trees, together with an unusual prevalence of slugs, which he had been puzzled to know the meaning of, until it flashed upon him with this melancholy conflagration.