minstrel


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min·strel

 (mĭn′strəl)
n.
1. A medieval entertainer who traveled from place to place, especially to sing and recite poetry.
2.
a. A lyric poet.
b. A musician.
3. A performer in a minstrel show.

[Middle English minstral, from Old French menestrel, servant, entertainer, from Late Latin ministeriālis, official in the imperial household, from Latin ministerium, ministry; see ministry.]

minstrel

(ˈmɪnstrəl)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a medieval wandering musician who performed songs or recited poetry with instrumental accompaniment
2. (Theatre) a performer in a minstrel show
3. archaic or poetic any poet, musician, or singer
[C13: from Old French menestral, from Late Latin ministeriālis an official, from Latin minister]

min•strel

(ˈmɪn strəl)

n.
1. a medieval poet, singer, and musician, who was either an itinerant or a member of a noble household.
2. a musician, singer, or poet.
3. a performer in a minstrel show.
[1175–1225; Middle English ministrel < Old French < Late Latin ministeriālis servant (n. use of adj.)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.minstrel - a singer of folk songsminstrel - a singer of folk songs    
singer, vocalist, vocalizer, vocaliser - a person who sings
2.minstrel - a performer in a minstrel show
minstrel show - a troupe of performers in blackface typically giving a comic program of negro songs and jokes
corner man, end man - a man at one end of line of performers in a minstrel show; carries on humorous dialogue with the interlocutor
interlocutor, middleman - the performer in the middle of a minstrel line who engages the others in talk
performer, performing artist - an entertainer who performs a dramatic or musical work for an audience
Verb1.minstrel - celebrate by singing, in the style of minstrelsminstrel - celebrate by singing, in the style of minstrels
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
sing - produce tones with the voice; "She was singing while she was cooking"; "My brother sings very well"

minstrel

noun musician, singer, harper, bard, troubadour, songstress, jongleur He was playing a banjo and garbed in a minstrel's outfit.
Translations
مُغَنٍّ مُتَجَوِّل في العُصور الوُسْطى
minstrel
troubadur
vándorénekes
farandsöngvari
menestrelis
menestrels
minstrel
gezici halk ozanısaz şairi

minstrel

[ˈmɪnstrəl] Njuglar m

minstrel

[ˈmɪnstrəl] nménestrel m

minstrel

n (medieval) → Spielmann m; (wandering) → (fahrender) Sänger; (= ballad-singer)Bänkelsänger m; (= singer of love songs)Minnesänger m; (esp US: modern) weißer, als Schwarzer zurechtgemachter Sänger und Komiker

minstrel

[ˈmɪnstrl] ngiullare m, menestrello

minstrel

(ˈminstrəl) noun
a musician who went about the country in medieval times, reciting or singing poems.
References in classic literature ?
We stood there in friendly silence, while the feeble minstrel sheltered in Antonia's hair went on with its scratchy chirp.
He was, in truth, a minstrel of the western continent--of a much later day, certainly, than those gifted bards, who formerly sang the profane renown of baron and prince, but after the spirit of his own age and country; and he was now prepared to exercise the cunning of his craft, in celebration of, or rather in thanksgiving for, the recent victory.
Here, it is true, were none of the appliances which popular merriment would so readily have found in the England of Elizabeth's time, or that of James -- no rude shows of a theatrical kind; no minstrel, with his harp and legendary ballad, nor gleeman with an ape dancing to his music; no juggler, with his tricks of mimic witchcraft; no Merry Andrew, to stir up the multitude with jests, perhaps a hundred years old, but still effective, by their appeals to the very broadest sources of mirthful sympathy.
The first of all the negro minstrel shows came to town, and made a sensation.
If, therefore, my dear friend, you have generosity enough to pardon the presumptuous attempt, to frame for myself a minstrel coronet, partly out of the pearls of pure antiquity, and partly from the Bristol stones and paste, with which I have endeavoured to imitate them, I am convinced your opinion of the difficulty of the task will reconcile you to the imperfect manner of its execution.
He seemed to be a strolling minstrel, for he bore a harp in his hand, which he thrummed, while his lusty tenor voice rang out with--
The third kind depends on memory when the sight of some object awakens a feeling: as in the Cyprians of Dicaeogenes, where the hero breaks into tears on seeing the picture; or again in the 'Lay of Alcinous,' where Odysseus, hearing the minstrel play the lyre, recalls the past and weeps; and hence the recognition.
If he had been the most heaven-taught minstrel in the whole world, on whose lips all hearers hang entranced, I could not have been more charmed as I sat in my hut and listened to him.
I believe I was held to have a sort of half-womanish, half-ghostly beauty; for the portrait-painters, who are thick as weeds at Geneva, had often asked me to sit to them, and I had been the model of a dying minstrel in a fancy picture.
Well, she was the daughter of Guybertant, minstrel of the barges at Reims, the same who had played before King Charles VII.
In some booths there was dancing to merry music, in others flowed ale and beer, and in others yet again sweet cakes and barley sugar were sold; and sport was going outside the booths also, where some minstrel sang ballads of the olden time, playing a second upon the harp, or where the wrestlers struggled with one another within the sawdust ring, but the people gathered most of all around a raised platform where stout fellows played at quarterstaff.
The night before that was Bank Holiday night and they had sat discussing their minstrel enterprise, drawing up a programme and rehearsing steps.