minstrel


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min·strel

 (mĭn′strəl)
n.
1. A medieval entertainer who traveled from place to place, especially to sing and recite poetry.
2.
a. A lyric poet.
b. A musician.
3. A performer in a minstrel show.

[Middle English minstral, from Old French menestrel, servant, entertainer, from Late Latin ministeriālis, official in the imperial household, from Latin ministerium, ministry; see ministry.]

minstrel

(ˈmɪnstrəl)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a medieval wandering musician who performed songs or recited poetry with instrumental accompaniment
2. (Theatre) a performer in a minstrel show
3. archaic or poetic any poet, musician, or singer
[C13: from Old French menestral, from Late Latin ministeriālis an official, from Latin minister]

min•strel

(ˈmɪn strəl)

n.
1. a medieval poet, singer, and musician, who was either an itinerant or a member of a noble household.
2. a musician, singer, or poet.
3. a performer in a minstrel show.
[1175–1225; Middle English ministrel < Old French < Late Latin ministeriālis servant (n. use of adj.)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.minstrel - a singer of folk songsminstrel - a singer of folk songs    
singer, vocalist, vocalizer, vocaliser - a person who sings
2.minstrel - a performer in a minstrel show
minstrel show - a troupe of performers in blackface typically giving a comic program of negro songs and jokes
corner man, end man - a man at one end of line of performers in a minstrel show; carries on humorous dialogue with the interlocutor
interlocutor, middleman - the performer in the middle of a minstrel line who engages the others in talk
performer, performing artist - an entertainer who performs a dramatic or musical work for an audience
Verb1.minstrel - celebrate by singing, in the style of minstrelsminstrel - celebrate by singing, in the style of minstrels
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
sing - produce tones with the voice; "She was singing while she was cooking"; "My brother sings very well"

minstrel

noun musician, singer, harper, bard, troubadour, songstress, jongleur He was playing a banjo and garbed in a minstrel's outfit.
Translations
مُغَنٍّ مُتَجَوِّل في العُصور الوُسْطى
minstrel
troubadur
vándorénekes
farandsöngvari
menestrelis
menestrels
minstrel
gezici halk ozanısaz şairi

minstrel

[ˈmɪnstrəl] Njuglar m

minstrel

[ˈmɪnstrəl] nménestrel m

minstrel

n (medieval) → Spielmann m; (wandering) → (fahrender) Sänger; (= ballad-singer)Bänkelsänger m; (= singer of love songs)Minnesänger m; (esp US: modern) weißer, als Schwarzer zurechtgemachter Sänger und Komiker

minstrel

[ˈmɪnstrl] ngiullare m, menestrello

minstrel

(ˈminstrəl) noun
a musician who went about the country in medieval times, reciting or singing poems.
References in classic literature ?
And the minstrel who had a good tale to tell was ever sure of a welcome, and for his pains he was rewarded with money, jewels, and even land.
It was no easy thing to be a minstrel, and a man often spent ten or twelve years in learning to be one.
He seemed to be a strolling minstrel, for he bore a harp in his hand, which he thrummed, while his lusty tenor voice rang out with--
So Robin went back to his camp, where he told of the minstrel.
I told Allan a-Dale, the northern minstrel, that he would damage the harp if he touched it after the seventh cup, but he would not be controlled Friend, I drink to thy successful performance.
It speedily appeared, that if the knight was not a complete master of the minstrel art, his taste for it had at least been cultivated under the best instructors.
1-4) Phoebus, of you even the swan sings with clear voice to the beating of his wings, as he alights upon the bank by the eddying river Peneus; and of you the sweet-tongued minstrel, holding his high-pitched lyre, always sings both first and last.
Among all races when a certain stage of social development is reached at least one such minstrel is to be found as a regular retainer at the court of every barbarous chief or king, ready to entertain the warriors at their feasts, with chants of heroes and battles and of the exploits of their present lord.
Out of the popular ballads, or, chiefly, of the minstrel poetry which is partly based on them, regularly develops epic poetry.
Murderous minstrel, instrument of evil, most innocent instrument
The third kind depends on memory when the sight of some object awakens a feeling: as in the Cyprians of Dicaeogenes, where the hero breaks into tears on seeing the picture; or again in the 'Lay of Alcinous,' where Odysseus, hearing the minstrel play the lyre, recalls the past and weeps; and hence the recognition.
This explains the welcome given by Chinese Emperors and Caliphs of Bagdad to all roving minstrels in whose immortality, like flies in amber, they are caught.