minuet


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min·u·et

 (mĭn′yo͞o-ĕt′)
n.
1. A slow, stately pattern dance in 3/4 time for groups of couples, originating in 17th-century France.
2. The music for this dance.
3. A movement in 3/4 time that is usually the third, but sometimes the second, of a four-movement symphony or string quartet.

[French menuet, from Old French, small, dainty (from the small steps characteristic of the dance), diminutive of menu, small, from Latin minūtus; see minute2.]

minuet

(ˌmɪnjʊˈɛt)
n
1. (Dancing) a stately court dance of the 17th and 18th centuries in triple time
2. (Classical Music) a piece of music composed for or in the rhythm of this dance, sometimes as a movement in a suite, sonata, or symphony. See also scherzo
[C17: from French menuet dainty (referring to the dance steps), from menu small]

min•u•et

(ˌmɪn yuˈɛt)

n.
1. a slow, stately dance in triple meter, popular in the 17th and 18th centuries.
2. a piece of music for such a dance or in its rhythm.
[1665–75; < French menuet=menu small (see menu) + -et -et; so called from the shortness of the dancers' steps]

minuet

1. An elegant 17th century French court dance, it began as a folk dance and gradually became a slower, more dignified and complex dance that graced many an aristocratic ballroom.
2. A graceful seventeenth-century court dance in triple time, used as third movement in many classical symphonies.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.minuet - a stately court dance in the 17th centuryminuet - a stately court dance in the 17th century
ballroom dance, ballroom dancing - any of a variety of social dances performed by couples in a ballroom
2.minuet - a stately piece of music composed for dancing the minuet; often incorporated into a sonata or suite
dance music - music to dance to
Translations
موسيقى المنيويت أو رَقْصَتُها
menuet
minuet
menüett
menúett
menuetas
menuets
menuet
menüet

minuet

[ˌmɪnjʊˈet] Nminué m

minuet

[ˌmɪnjuˈɛt] nmenuet m

minuet

nMenuett nt

minuet

[ˌmɪnjʊˈɛt] nminuetto

minuet

(minjuˈet) noun
(a piece of music to accompany) an old type of graceful dance.
References in classic literature ?
To find the born and educated lady, on the other hand, we need look no farther than Hepzibah, our forlorn old maid, in her rustling and rusty silks, with her deeply cherished and ridiculous consciousness of long descent, her shadowy claims to princely territory, and, in the way of accomplishment, her recollections, it may be, of having formerly thrummed on a harpsichord, and walked a minuet, and worked an antique tapestry-stitch on her sampler.
The experience of Miss Emmerson went no further than the simple evolutions of the country dance, or the deliberate and dignified procession of the minuet.
My accomplishments too, begin to fade--I can neither sing so well nor Dance so gracefully as I once did--and I have entirely forgot the MINUET DELA COUR.
A tune much iterated has the ridiculous effect of making the words in my mind perform a sort of minuet to keep time--an effect hardly tolerable, I imagine, after boyhood.
But I found my mistake, when I heard the sound of a kit playing a minuet over our heads.
Quite unconscious that his master was looking on from the dark corner by the parlour door, Sim threw off the paper cap, sprang from his seat, and in two extraordinary steps, something between skating and minuet dancing, bounded to a washing place at the other end of the shop, and there removed from his face and hands all traces of his previous work--practising the same step all the time with the utmost gravity.
Indeed the dancing-master was so proud of it, and so wishful to display it before he left to a few select friends among the collegians, that at six o'clock on a certain fine morning, a minuet de la cour came off in the yard--the college- rooms being of too confined proportions for the purpose--in which so much ground was covered, and the steps were so conscientiously executed, that the dancing-master, having to play the kit besides, was thoroughly blown.
I have come down expressly to have a long talk, and another rubber with you; and we'll show these boys and girls how to dance a minuet, before they're eight-and- forty hours older.
She sometimes played tunes upon them with her fingers - minuets and marches I should think - but never moved them.
Again, there was the little French chevalier opposite, who gave lessons in his native tongue at various schools in the neighbourhood, and who might be heard in his apartment of nights playing tremulous old gavottes and minuets on a wheezy old fiddle.
Those little shepherds were supposed to have looked down upon /la mere beaute/, and upon /la plus jolie fille de France/ as she danced her incomparable minuets.
So if even he finds the minuet taxing, it gives you an idea of how challenging it was.