mire


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mire

 (mīr)
n.
1. An area of wet, soggy, muddy ground; a bog.
2. Deep slimy soil or mud.
3. A disadvantageous or difficult condition or situation: the mire of poverty.
v. mired, mir·ing, mires
v.tr.
1.
a. To cause to sink or become stuck in mire.
b. To hinder, entrap, or entangle.
2. To soil with mud or mire.
v.intr.
To sink or become stuck in mire.

[Middle English, from Old Norse mȳrr, bog.]

mire

(maɪə)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a boggy or marshy area
2. mud, muck, or dirt
vb
3. to sink or cause to sink in a mire
4. (tr) to make dirty or muddy
5. (tr) to involve, esp in difficulties
[C14: from Old Norse mӯrr; related to moss]
ˈmiriness n
ˈmiry adj

mire

(maɪər)

n., v. mired, mir•ing. n.
1. an area of wet, swampy ground; bog; marsh.
2. ground of this kind, as deep mud.
v.t.
3. to cause to stick in mire.
4. to involve; entangle.
5. to soil with mire.
v.i.
6. to sink or stick in mire.
[1300–50; Middle English < Old Norse mȳrr bog; c. Old English mēos moss]
mir′y, adj.

mire


Past participle: mired
Gerund: miring

Imperative
mire
mire
Present
I mire
you mire
he/she/it mires
we mire
you mire
they mire
Preterite
I mired
you mired
he/she/it mired
we mired
you mired
they mired
Present Continuous
I am miring
you are miring
he/she/it is miring
we are miring
you are miring
they are miring
Present Perfect
I have mired
you have mired
he/she/it has mired
we have mired
you have mired
they have mired
Past Continuous
I was miring
you were miring
he/she/it was miring
we were miring
you were miring
they were miring
Past Perfect
I had mired
you had mired
he/she/it had mired
we had mired
you had mired
they had mired
Future
I will mire
you will mire
he/she/it will mire
we will mire
you will mire
they will mire
Future Perfect
I will have mired
you will have mired
he/she/it will have mired
we will have mired
you will have mired
they will have mired
Future Continuous
I will be miring
you will be miring
he/she/it will be miring
we will be miring
you will be miring
they will be miring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been miring
you have been miring
he/she/it has been miring
we have been miring
you have been miring
they have been miring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been miring
you will have been miring
he/she/it will have been miring
we will have been miring
you will have been miring
they will have been miring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been miring
you had been miring
he/she/it had been miring
we had been miring
you had been miring
they had been miring
Conditional
I would mire
you would mire
he/she/it would mire
we would mire
you would mire
they would mire
Past Conditional
I would have mired
you would have mired
he/she/it would have mired
we would have mired
you would have mired
they would have mired
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mire - a soft wet area of low-lying land that sinks underfootmire - a soft wet area of low-lying land that sinks underfoot
bog, peat bog - wet spongy ground of decomposing vegetation; has poorer drainage than a swamp; soil is unfit for cultivation but can be cut and dried and used for fuel
2.mire - deep soft mud in water or slush; "they waded through the slop"
mud, clay - water soaked soil; soft wet earth
3.mire - a difficulty or embarrassment that is hard to extricate yourself from; "the country is still trying to climb out of the mire left by its previous president"; "caught in the mire of poverty"
difficulty - a condition or state of affairs almost beyond one's ability to deal with and requiring great effort to bear or overcome; "grappling with financial difficulties"
Verb1.mire - entrap; "Our people should not be mired in the past"
involve - engage as a participant; "Don't involve me in your family affairs!"
2.mire - cause to get stuck as if in a mire; "The mud mired our cart"
get stuck, grind to a halt, mire, bog down - be unable to move further; "The car bogged down in the sand"
3.mire - be unable to move furthermire - be unable to move further; "The car bogged down in the sand"
stand still - remain in place; hold still; remain fixed or immobile; "Traffic stood still when the funeral procession passed by"
bog down, mire - cause to get stuck as if in a mire; "The mud mired our cart"
4.mire - soil with mud, muck, or miremire - soil with mud, muck, or mire; "The child mucked up his shirt while playing ball in the garden"
begrime, bemire, colly, dirty, grime, soil - make soiled, filthy, or dirty; "don't soil your clothes when you play outside!"

mire

noun
1. mess, trouble, difficulty, emergency, jam (informal), plight, straits, hot water (informal), predicament, tight spot or corner The economy is not out of the mire yet.
2. mud, dirt, muck, ooze, sludge, slime, slob (Irish), gloop (informal), grot (slang) the muck and mire of farmyards
3. swamp, marsh, bog, fen, quagmire, morass, wetland Many of those killed were buried in the mire.
verb
1. soil, dirty, muddy, besmirch, begrime, bespatter The party has been mired by allegations of sleaze.
2. entangle, involve, mix up, catch up, bog down, tangle up, enmesh The minister still remains mired in the controversy of the affair.
in the mire in trouble, entangled, in difficulties, encumbered We're still in the mire, but I think we're good enough to escape.

mire

noun
1. A usually low-lying area of soft waterlogged ground and standing water:
2. A viscous, usually offensively dirty substance:
verb
To soil with mud:
Translations

mire

[maɪəʳ]
A. Nfango m, lodo m
B. VT (US) to get mired inquedar atascado or preso en

mire

[ˈmaɪər] nbourbier m
the mire (= serious difficulties) → le bourbier
They have struggled out of the mire → Ils se sont sortis du bourbier.
to be in the mire → être dans le bourbier
to sink into the mire (= get into difficulties) → s'embourber
to be deep in the mire → être embourbé dans la crise
a company deep in the mire → une compagnie profondément embourbée dans la crise

mire

nMorast m (also fig), → Schlamm m; the football pitch was an absolute mireder Fußballplatz war ein einziges Schlammfeld; to drag somebody/something through the mire (fig)jdn/etw in den Schmutz ziehen

mire

[maɪə] npantano, melma
References in classic literature ?
AN Ox, unable to extricate himself from the mire into which he sank, was advised to make use of a Political Pull.
They are really islands cut off on all sides by the impassable mire, which has crawled round them in the course of years.
At last he came to a part of the road where the wheels sank half-way into the mire, and the more the horses pulled, the deeper sank the wheels.
Never can there come fog too thick, never can there come mud and mire too deep, to assort with the groping and floundering condition which this High Court of Chancery, most pestilent of hoary sinners, holds this day in the sight of heaven and earth.
It is likely enough that in the rough outhouses of some tillers of the heavy lands adjacent to Paris, there were sheltered from the weather that very day, rude carts, bespattered with rustic mire, snuffed about by pigs, and roosted in by poultry, which the Farmer, Death, had already set apart to be his tumbrils of the Revolution.
She told him of the penalty of breaking the taboo of the Red One--a week of torture, living, the details of which she yammered out from her face in the mire until he realized that he was yet a tyro in knowledge of the frightfulness the human was capable of wreaking on the human.
The more conscious I was of goodness and of all that was "sublime and beautiful," the more deeply I sank into my mire and the more ready I was to sink in it altogether.
Thus working his way along, he at length found himself close to a marsh, or what he knew would soon become a marsh, for night had set in some hours before, and he fell by a sudden misstep into a thick, clinging mire.
The human had to pass through those stages in its rise from the mire and slime of low organic life.
When the horses were swollen out to about twice their natural dimensions (there seems to be an idea here, that this kind of inflation improves their going), we went forward again, through mud and mire, and damp, and festering heat, and brake and bush, attended always by the music of the frogs and pigs, until nearly noon, when we halted at a place called Belleville.
He's expected at night, and the pasty's made hot, They broach the brown ale, and they fill the black pot, And the goodwife would wish the goodman in the mire, Ere he lack'd a soft pillow, the Barefooted Friar.
He was obliged to walk upon bog tufts and watch his feet to keep from the oily mire.