mischance


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mis·chance

 (mĭs-chăns′)
n.
1. An unfortunate occurrence; a mishap.
2. Bad luck.

mischance

(mɪsˈtʃɑːns)
n
1. bad luck
2. a stroke of bad luck

mis•chance

(mɪsˈtʃæns, -ˈtʃɑns)

n.
1. a mishap.
2. bad luck.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mischance - an unpredictable outcome that is unfortunatemischance - an unpredictable outcome that is unfortunate; "if I didn't have bad luck I wouldn't have any luck at all"
fortune, hazard, luck, chance - an unknown and unpredictable phenomenon that causes an event to result one way rather than another; "bad luck caused his downfall"; "we ran into each other by pure chance"
2.mischance - an instance of misfortunemischance - an instance of misfortune    
accident - an unfortunate mishap; especially one causing damage or injury
near miss - an accidental collision that is narrowly avoided
derailment - an accident in which a train runs off its track
ground loop - a sharp uncontrollable turn made by an airplane while moving along the ground
misfortune, bad luck - unnecessary and unforeseen trouble resulting from an unfortunate event
puncture - loss of air pressure in a tire when a hole is made by some sharp object
trip, slip - an accidental misstep threatening (or causing) a fall; "he blamed his slip on the ice"; "the jolt caused many slips and a few spills"
crash - (computer science) an event that causes a computer system to become inoperative; "the crash occurred during a thunderstorm and the system has been down ever since"

mischance

noun misfortune, accident, mishap, disaster, bad luck, calamity, misadventure, bummer (slang), contretemps, bad break (informal), ill fortune, ill luck, infelicity, ill chance By some mischance, the two letters were lost in the post.

mischance

noun
An unexpected and usually undesirable event:
Translations
سوء حَظ
smůla
uheld
óheppni
neveiksme

mischance

[mɪsˈtʃɑːns] Ndesgracia f, mala suerte f
by some mischancepor desgracia

mischance

[mɪsˈtʃɑːns] nmalchance f
by some mischance → par malheur

mischance

nunglücklicher Zufall; by some mischancedurch einen unglücklichen Zufall

mischance

[ˌmɪsˈtʃɑːns] n by (some) mischanceper sfortuna

mischance

(misˈtʃaːns) noun
(a piece of) bad luck.
References in classic literature ?
I think,' answered the bean, 'that as we have so fortunately escaped death, we should keep together like good companions, and lest a new mischance should overtake us here, we should go away together, and repair to a foreign country.
You contemplate mentally your mischance, till little by little your mood changes, cold doubt steals into the very marrow of your bones, you see the inexplicable fact in another light.
Realizing his mischance, he smiled; central New York is not a region of perils, nor does one long remain lost in it.
That, immediately, on a signal, the prisoner was removed to the interior of the prison again; but, that he, the Doctor, had then so strongly pleaded for permission to remain and assure himself that his son-in-law was, through no malice or mischance, delivered to the concourse whose murderous yells outside the gate had often drowned the proceedings, that he had obtained the permission, and had remained in that Hall of Blood until the danger was over.
He would have been discovered by the beating of his heart, if by any mischance the jailers had entered at that moment.
She felt all the perverseness of the mischance that should bring him where no one else was brought, and, to prevent its ever happening again, took care to inform him at first that it was a favourite haunt of hers.
A combination of sickness and mischance found the stage stables short a driver.
He belonged to Bagdad, and joined my ship at Balsora, but by mischance he was left behind upon a desert island where we had landed to fill up our water-casks, and it was not until four hours later that he was missed.
That it was abundantly sufficient to reconcile the mind to any of these mischances, to reflect that they are liable to befal the wisest of mankind, and are undoubtedly for the good of the whole.
One of his most intimate friends was a merchant who, from a flourishing state, fell, through numerous mischances, into poverty.
Due to global sea level rise (SLR), over the next centuries up to half a billion people now living in coastal plains will have to either relocate to higher terrain, exist on floating cities or, by mischance, may even drown.
Webster uses an imagined space--both geographical and discursive--to narrate a tragic liaison that becomes a metonymy of the precarious and destructive relationship between poetry as song, the song of the lute and the words it calls forth, the mundane world of flux and mischance, and the moral world of duty and family ties.