mischance


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mis·chance

 (mĭs-chăns′)
n.
1. An unfortunate occurrence; a mishap.
2. Bad luck.

mischance

(mɪsˈtʃɑːns)
n
1. bad luck
2. a stroke of bad luck

mis•chance

(mɪsˈtʃæns, -ˈtʃɑns)

n.
1. a mishap.
2. bad luck.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mischance - an unpredictable outcome that is unfortunatemischance - an unpredictable outcome that is unfortunate; "if I didn't have bad luck I wouldn't have any luck at all"
fortune, hazard, luck, chance - an unknown and unpredictable phenomenon that causes an event to result one way rather than another; "bad luck caused his downfall"; "we ran into each other by pure chance"
2.mischance - an instance of misfortunemischance - an instance of misfortune    
accident - an unfortunate mishap; especially one causing damage or injury
near miss - an accidental collision that is narrowly avoided
derailment - an accident in which a train runs off its track
ground loop - a sharp uncontrollable turn made by an airplane while moving along the ground
misfortune, bad luck - unnecessary and unforeseen trouble resulting from an unfortunate event
puncture - loss of air pressure in a tire when a hole is made by some sharp object
trip, slip - an accidental misstep threatening (or causing) a fall; "he blamed his slip on the ice"; "the jolt caused many slips and a few spills"
crash - (computer science) an event that causes a computer system to become inoperative; "the crash occurred during a thunderstorm and the system has been down ever since"

mischance

noun misfortune, accident, mishap, disaster, bad luck, calamity, misadventure, bummer (slang), contretemps, bad break (informal), ill fortune, ill luck, infelicity, ill chance By some mischance, the two letters were lost in the post.

mischance

noun
An unexpected and usually undesirable event:
Translations
سوء حَظ
smůla
uheld
óheppni
neveiksme

mischance

[mɪsˈtʃɑːns] Ndesgracia f, mala suerte f
by some mischancepor desgracia

mischance

[mɪsˈtʃɑːns] nmalchance f
by some mischance → par malheur

mischance

nunglücklicher Zufall; by some mischancedurch einen unglücklichen Zufall

mischance

[ˌmɪsˈtʃɑːns] n by (some) mischanceper sfortuna

mischance

(misˈtʃaːns) noun
(a piece of) bad luck.
References in classic literature ?
Sagaciously under their spectacles, did they peep into the holds of vessels Mighty was their fuss about little matters, and marvellous, sometimes, the obtuseness that allowed greater ones to slip between their fingers Whenever such a mischance occurred -- when a waggon-load of valuable merchandise had been smuggled ashore, at noonday, perhaps, and directly beneath their unsuspicious noses -- nothing could exceed the vigilance and alacrity with which they proceeded to lock, and double-lock, and secure with tape and sealing -- wax, all the avenues of the delinquent vessel.
If by any mischance the sleep-walking fit had seized him, the slippers in old Mazey's hand pointed straight to the conclusion that followed -- his master must have passed barefoot in the cold night over the stone stairs and passages of St.
That, immediately, on a signal, the prisoner was removed to the interior of the prison again; but, that he, the Doctor, had then so strongly pleaded for permission to remain and assure himself that his son-in-law was, through no malice or mischance, delivered to the concourse whose murderous yells outside the gate had often drowned the proceedings, that he had obtained the permission, and had remained in that Hall of Blood until the danger was over.
He belonged to Bagdad, and joined my ship at Balsora, but by mischance he was left behind upon a desert island where we had landed to fill up our water-casks, and it was not until four hours later that he was missed.
One day, while he was watching the horses, he came to the banks of a river, and saw a big fish, which through some mischance had been cast on the land, struggling hard to get back into the water.
By mischance I am," replied Don Quixote; "though the ills arising from well-bestowed affections should be esteemed favours rather than misfortunes.
The night slipped away without any mischance, the islanders frightened no doubt at the sight of a monster aground in the bay.
It appears, according to your account, that if by mischance a Musketeer is arrested, France is in danger.
He would have been discovered by the beating of his heart, if by any mischance the jailers had entered at that moment.
She felt all the perverseness of the mischance that should bring him where no one else was brought, and, to prevent its ever happening again, took care to inform him at first that it was a favourite haunt of hers.
You contemplate mentally your mischance, till little by little your mood changes, cold doubt steals into the very marrow of your bones, you see the inexplicable fact in another light.
Frances gives this something in her son's marked character no name; but when it appears in the grinding of his teeth, in the glittering of his eye, in the fierce revolt of feeling against disappointment, mischance, sudden sorrow, or supposed injustice, she folds him to her breast, or takes him to walk with her alone in the wood; then she reasons with him like any philosopher, and to reason Victor is ever accessible; then she looks at him with eyes of love, and by love Victor can be infallibly subjugated; but will reason or love be the weapons with which in future the world will meet his violence?