miscreant


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mis·cre·ant

 (mĭs′krē-ənt)
n.
1. One who behaves badly, often by breaking rules of conduct or the law.
2. Archaic One who does not believe in a certain religion; an infidel or heretic.

[Middle English miscreaunt, heretic, from Old French mescreant, present participle of mescroire, to disbelieve : mes-, wrongly, not; see mis-1 + croire, to believe (from Latin crēdere; see kerd- in Indo-European roots).]

mis′cre·ant adj.

miscreant

(ˈmɪskrɪənt)
n
1. a wrongdoer or villain
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) archaic an unbeliever or heretic
adj
3. evil or villainous
4. (Ecclesiastical Terms) archaic unbelieving or heretical
[C14: from Old French mescreant unbelieving, from mes- mis-1 + creant, ultimately from Latin credere to believe]

mis•cre•ant

(ˈmɪs kri ənt)

adj.
1. depraved; villainous.
2. heretical.
n.
3. a vicious or depraved person.
4. heretic; infidel.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French mescreant unbelieving =mes- mis-1 + creant « Latin crēdentem, derivative present participle of crēdere to believe]
mis′cre•an•cy, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.miscreant - a person without moral scruplesmiscreant - a person without moral scruples  
offender, wrongdoer - a person who transgresses moral or civil law
degenerate, deviant, deviate, pervert - a person whose behavior deviates from what is acceptable especially in sexual behavior
black sheep, scapegrace - a reckless and unprincipled reprobate
wretch - performs some wicked deed

miscreant

noun
1. wrongdoer, criminal, villain, rogue, sinner, rascal, scoundrel, scally (Northwest English dialect), vagabond, knave (archaic), reprobate, malefactor, blackguard, evildoer, caitiff (archaic), skelm (S. African) Local people demanded that the magistrate apprehend the miscreants.
adjective

miscreant

adjective
Utterly reprehensible in nature or behavior:
Translations
kacířkacířskýnevěrecničemaničemný

miscreant

[ˈmɪskrɪənt] Nsinvergüenza mf, bellaco/a m/f

miscreant

n (old)Bösewicht m (old), → Schurke m
References in classic literature ?
Go, then; talk openly to the miscreant, and seem to believe him the truest friend you have on 'arth.
For a whole week he was not able to sleep well, so much the villainy which he had played upon his trusting mother preyed upon his rag of conscience; but after that he began to get comfortable again, and was presently able to sleep like any other miscreant.
And when he had finished and still stood alive and whole, their wavering impulse to break their oath and save the poor betrayed prisoner's life faded and vanished away, for plainly this miscreant had sold himself to Satan and it would be fatal to meddle with the property of such a power as that.
These, in their turn, cursed back at the blind miscreant, threatened him in horrid terms, and tried in vain to catch the stick and wrest it from his grasp.
Moncharmin's last phrase so dearly expressed the suspicion in which he now held his partner that it was bound to cause a stormy explanation, at the end of which it was agreed that Richard should yield to all Moncharmin's wishes, with the object of helping him to discover the miscreant who was victimizing them.
Yonder lies Antaeus, our great friend and brother, slain, within our territory, by a miscreant who took him at disadvantage, and fought him (if fighting it can be called) in a way that neither man, nor Giant, nor Pygmy ever dreamed of fighting, until this hour.
A distinguished gentleman of this city, H H , Esquire, having been compelled to SUSPEND, in consequence of the late robbery of the Bank of the United States by the cold-blooded miscreant whose hoary head disgraces the White House, felt himself bound to return an article of dress, purchased as recently as yesterday by his lovely daughter, and who, in every respect, was entitled to wear it, as she would have adorned it, receiving back the price, with a view to put it in the fund he is already collecting to meet the demands of his creditors.
echoed Edwards: “is it a crime to drive a prying miscreant from his door?
Stuart gave the word, when Ben Jones leveled his rifle, and shot the miscreant on the spot.
He is a German by birth, and is called Giant Transcendentalist; but as to his form, his features, his substance, and his nature generally, it is the chief peculiarity of this huge miscreant that neither he for himself, nor anybody for him, has ever been able to describe them.
The miscreant, a bony young man scorched black by the sun, rose to greet her with the courtesy of a host and the assurance of a relative.
It was clear that the miscreant was in a parlous state.