misdemeanor


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mis·de·mean·or

 (mĭs′dĭ-mē′nər)
n.
1. A misdeed.
2. Law A criminal offense that is less serious than a felony and generally punishable by a fine, a jail term of up to a year, or both.

mis•de•mean•or

(ˌmɪs dɪˈmi nər)

n.
1. a criminal offense less serious than a felony.
2. an instance of bad behavior.
[1480–90]

misdemeanor

An offense that is less serious than a felony.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.misdemeanor - a crime less serious than a felony
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
breach of the peace, disorderly behavior, disorderly conduct, disturbance of the peace - any act of molesting, interrupting, hindering, agitating, or arousing from a state of repose or otherwise depriving inhabitants of the peace and quiet to which they are entitled
false pretence, false pretense - (law) an offense involving intent to defraud and false representation and obtaining property as a result of that misrepresentation
indecent exposure, public nudity - vulgar and offensive nakedness in a public place
bearing false witness, lying under oath, perjury - criminal offense of making false statements under oath
sedition - an illegal action inciting resistance to lawful authority and tending to cause the disruption or overthrow of the government
References in classic literature ?
Violation of this law was made a high misdemeanor and punished accordingly.
Leaving the name standing, and the date and length of the captivity, they had erased the description of the misdemeanor, and written in its place, in staring capitals, "FOR THEFT
If a slave was convicted of any high misdemeanor, became unmanageable, or evinced a determination to run away, he was brought immedi- ately here, severely whipped, put on board the sloop, carried to Baltimore, and sold to Austin Woolfolk, or some other slave-trader, as a warning to the slaves remaining.
I am sorry," the Prince said, with a touch of added gravity in his manner, "that one of my race should have committed a misdemeanor in this country, but if that is so, your way, of course, is clear.
Tulliver's way, if she blamed Tom, to refer his misdemeanor, somehow or other, to Maggie.
said Baisemeaux, and he poured out a great glass of wine and drank it off at a draught, trembling with joy at the idea of being, by hook or by crook, in the secret of some high archiepiscopal misdemeanor.
Surely to assault truth is a more serious misdemeanor than to insult a pygmy personality such as the judge's.
In plain terms, he was an incorrigible scoundrel; and he had now added one more to the list of his many misdemeanors by impudently breaking the conditions on which Mrs.
The President of the United States would be liable to be impeached, tried, and, upon conviction of treason, bribery, or other high crimes or misdemeanors, removed from office; and would afterwards be liable to prosecution and punishment in the ordinary course of law.
The above is a manly and handsome aknowledgment of past misdemeanors.
The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.
Dennis Doty, 49, of Murphysboro, pleaded guilty to battery, a Class A misdemeanor.