miser


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mi·ser

 (mī′zər)
n.
1. One who lives very meagerly in order to hoard money.
2. A greedy or avaricious person.

[From Latin, wretched.]

miser

(ˈmaɪzə)
n
1. a person who hoards money or possessions, often living miserably
2. selfish person
[C16: from Latin: wretched]

miser

(ˈmaɪzə)
n
(Civil Engineering) civil engineering a large hand-operated auger used for loose soils
[C19: origin unknown]

mi•ser

(ˈmaɪ zər)

n.
1. a person who lives poorly in order to save money.
2. a stingy, avaricious person.
[1550–60; < Latin: wretched]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.miser - a stingy hoarder of money and possessions (often living miserably)miser - a stingy hoarder of money and possessions (often living miserably)
cheapskate, tightwad - a miserly person
hoarder - a person who accumulates things and hides them away for future use

miser

noun hoarder, Scrooge, penny-pincher (informal), curmudgeon, skinflint, screw (slang), cheapskate (informal), tight-arse (taboo slang), tightwad (U.S. & Canad. slang), churl (archaic), tight-ass (U.S. taboo slang), niggard I'm married to a miser.

miser

noun
A stingy person:
Informal: penny pincher.
Translations
بَخيلبَخِيلٌ
lakomec
gnier
saituri
škrtac
nirfill, nánös
どけち
구두쇠
niekingai menkasšykštumasšykštuolis
sīkstulis
lakomec
skopuh
snåljåp
คนตระหนี่
cimri kimsepinti
người keo kiệt

miser

[ˈmaɪzəʳ] Navaro/a m/f

miser

[ˈmaɪzər] navare m/f

miser

nGeizhals m, → Geizkragen m

miser

[ˈmɑɪzəʳ] navaro/a

miser

(ˈmaizə) noun
a mean person who lives very poorly in order to store up wealth. That old miser won't give you a cent!
ˈmiserly adjective
ˈmiserliness noun

miser

بَخِيلٌ lakomec gnier Geizhals φιλάργυρος avaro saituri avare škrtac avaro どけち 구두쇠 vrek gjerrigknark skąpiec avarento скряга snåljåp คนตระหนี่ pinti người keo kiệt 吝啬鬼
References in classic literature ?
March would not leave Beth's side, but rested in the big chair, waking often to look at, touch, and brood over her child, like a miser over some recovered treasure.
The cobbler wrought upon a shoe; the blacksmith hammered his iron, the soldier waved his glittering blade; the lady raised a tiny breeze with her fan; the jolly toper swigged lustily at his bottle; a scholar opened his book with eager thirst for knowledge, and turned his head to and fro along the page; the milkmaid energetically drained her cow; and a miser counted gold into his strong-box,--all at the same turning of a crank.
I saw the fences half consumed, their ends lost in the middle of the prairie, and some worldly miser with a surveyor looking after his bounds, while heaven had taken place around him, and he did not see the angels going to and fro, but was looking for an old post-hole in the midst of paradise.
He had been all his life collecting his library, book and book, and he lived it as a miser loves his hoarded gold.
The canisters were almost out of her reach; I made a motion to aid her; she turned upon me as a miser might turn if any one attempted to assist him in counting his gold.
He was such an inborn miser that the bare prospect of being liberal in theory only daunted him.
Barkis was something of a miser, or as Peggotty dutifully expressed it, was 'a little near', and kept a heap of money in a box under his bed, which he pretended was only full of coats and trousers.
Not more than five or six hundred thousand francs," said Lord Wilmore; "he is a miser.
I speak of that spiteful and intriguing Italian -- of the pedant who has tried to put on his own head a crown which he stole from under a pillow -- of the scoundrel who calls his party the party of the king -- who wants to send the princes of the blood to prison, not daring to kill them, as our great cardinal -- our cardinal did -- of the miser, who weighs his gold pieces and keeps the clipped ones for fear, though he is rich, of losing them at play next morning -- of the impudent fellow who insults the queen, as they say -- so much the worse for her -- and who is going in three months to make war upon us, in order that he may retain his pensions; is that the master whom you propose to me?
The handbills of the selectmen would cause the commitment of all the vagabonds in the State; the paragraph in the Parker's Falls Gazette would be reprinted from Maine to Florida, and perhaps form an item in the London newspapers; and many a miser would tremble for his money bags and life, on learning the catastrophe of Mr.
I remember many called me miser at the time, and I used to couple the reproach with this consolation--better to be misunderstood now than repulsed hereafter.
The old staircase Is full of pitfalls, and the churlish moon Grows, like a miser, niggard of her beams, And hides her face behind a muslin mask As harlots do when they go forth to snare Some wretched soul in sin.