mitigate


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mit·i·gate

 (mĭt′ĭ-gāt′)
tr.v. mit·i·gat·ed, mit·i·gat·ing, mit·i·gates
1. To make less severe or intense; moderate or alleviate. See Synonyms at relieve.
2. To make alterations to (land) to make it less polluted or more hospitable to wildlife.
Phrasal Verb:
mitigate against Usage Problem
1. To take measures to moderate or alleviate (something).
2. To be a strong factor against (someone or something); hinder or prevent.

[Middle English mitigaten, from Latin mītigāre, mītigāt- : mītis, soft + agere, to drive, do; see act.]

mit′i·ga·ble (-gə-bəl) adj.
mit′i·ga′tion n.
mit′i·ga′tive, mit′i·ga·to′ry (-gə-tôr′ē) adj.
mit′i·ga′tor n.
Usage Note: Mitigate, meaning "to make less severe, alleviate" is sometimes used where militate, which means "to cause a change," might be expected. The confusion arises when the subject of mitigate is an impersonal factor or influence, and the verb is followed by the preposition against, so the meaning of the phrase is something like "to be a powerful factor against" or "to hinder or prevent," as in His relative youth might mitigate against him in a national election. Some 70 percent of the Usage Panel rejected this usage of mitigate against in our 2009 survey. Some 56 percent also rejected the intransitive use of mitigate meaning "to take action to alleviate something undesirable," in What steps can the town take to mitigate against damage from coastal storms? Perhaps the use with against in the one instance has soured Panelists on its use in the other. This intransitive use is relatively recent in comparison with the long-established transitive use, so novelty might play a role as well.

mitigate

(ˈmɪtɪˌɡeɪt)
vb
to make or become less severe or harsh; moderate
[C15: from Latin mītigāre, from mītis mild + agere to make]
mitigable adj
ˌmitiˈgation n
ˈmitiˌgative, ˈmitiˌgatory adj
ˈmitiˌgator n
Usage: Mitigate is sometimes wrongly used where militate is meant: his behaviour militates (not mitigates) against his chances of promotion

mit•i•gate

(ˈmɪt ɪˌgeɪt)

v. -gat•ed, -gat•ing. v.t.
1. to lessen in force or intensity; make less severe: to mitigate the harshness of a punishment.
2. to make milder or more gentle; mollify.
v.i.
3. to become milder; lessen in severity.
[1375–1425; < Latin mītigātus, past participle of mītigāre to calm, soothe =mīt(is) mild + -igāre (see fumigate)]
mit′i•ga•ble (-gə bəl) adj.
mit′i•gat`ed•ly, adv.
mit`i•ga′tion, n.
mit′i•ga`tive, mit′i•ga•to`ry (-gəˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
mit′i•ga`tor, n.
usage: mitigate against (to weigh against) is widely regarded as an error. The actual phrase is militate against:This criticism in no way militates against your continuing the research.

mitigate


Past participle: mitigated
Gerund: mitigating

Imperative
mitigate
mitigate
Present
I mitigate
you mitigate
he/she/it mitigates
we mitigate
you mitigate
they mitigate
Preterite
I mitigated
you mitigated
he/she/it mitigated
we mitigated
you mitigated
they mitigated
Present Continuous
I am mitigating
you are mitigating
he/she/it is mitigating
we are mitigating
you are mitigating
they are mitigating
Present Perfect
I have mitigated
you have mitigated
he/she/it has mitigated
we have mitigated
you have mitigated
they have mitigated
Past Continuous
I was mitigating
you were mitigating
he/she/it was mitigating
we were mitigating
you were mitigating
they were mitigating
Past Perfect
I had mitigated
you had mitigated
he/she/it had mitigated
we had mitigated
you had mitigated
they had mitigated
Future
I will mitigate
you will mitigate
he/she/it will mitigate
we will mitigate
you will mitigate
they will mitigate
Future Perfect
I will have mitigated
you will have mitigated
he/she/it will have mitigated
we will have mitigated
you will have mitigated
they will have mitigated
Future Continuous
I will be mitigating
you will be mitigating
he/she/it will be mitigating
we will be mitigating
you will be mitigating
they will be mitigating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been mitigating
you have been mitigating
he/she/it has been mitigating
we have been mitigating
you have been mitigating
they have been mitigating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been mitigating
you will have been mitigating
he/she/it will have been mitigating
we will have been mitigating
you will have been mitigating
they will have been mitigating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been mitigating
you had been mitigating
he/she/it had been mitigating
we had been mitigating
you had been mitigating
they had been mitigating
Conditional
I would mitigate
you would mitigate
he/she/it would mitigate
we would mitigate
you would mitigate
they would mitigate
Past Conditional
I would have mitigated
you would have mitigated
he/she/it would have mitigated
we would have mitigated
you would have mitigated
they would have mitigated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.mitigate - lessen or to try to lessen the seriousness or extent ofmitigate - lessen or to try to lessen the seriousness or extent of; "The circumstances extenuate the crime"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
apologise, rationalize, apologize, rationalise, justify, excuse - defend, explain, clear away, or make excuses for by reasoning; "rationalize the child's seemingly crazy behavior"; "he rationalized his lack of success"
2.mitigate - make less severe or harsh; "mitigating circumstances"
lighten, relieve - alleviate or remove (pressure or stress) or make less oppressive; "relieve the pressure and the stress"; "lighten the burden of caring for her elderly parents"
minify, decrease, lessen - make smaller; "He decreased his staff"

mitigate

verb ease, moderate, soften, check, quiet, calm, weaken, dull, diminish, temper, blunt, soothe, subdue, lessen, appease, lighten, remit, allay, placate, abate, tone down, assuage, pacify, mollify, take the edge off, extenuate, tranquillize, palliate, reduce the force of ways of mitigating the effects of an explosion
increase, strengthen, enhance, intensify, heighten, aggravate, augment
Usage: Mitigate is sometimes wrongly used where militate is meant: his behaviour militates (not mitigates) against his chances of promotion.

mitigate

verb
To make less severe or more bearable:
Translations
snížitzmírnit
helpottaalieventää
złagodzićzminimalizowaćzmniejszyć
lindramildra

mitigate

[ˈmɪtɪgeɪt] VTaliviar, mitigar
mitigating circumstancescircunstancias fpl atenuantes

mitigate

[ˈmɪtɪgeɪt] vt (= reduce) [+ effect] → atténuer
ways of mitigating the effects of the illness → des moyens d'atténuer les effets de la maladie

mitigate

vt painlindern; punishmentmildern; mitigating circumstances/factorsmildernde Umstände pl

mitigate

[ˈmɪtɪˌgeɪt] vt (punishment) → mitigare; (suffering) → alleviare

mit·i·gate

vt. mitigar, aliviar, calmar.
References in classic literature ?
The task will not be difficult," returned David, hesitating; "though I greatly fear your presence would rather increase than mitigate his unhappy fortunes.
The young man was tried and convicted of the crime; but either the circumstantial nature of the evidence, and possibly some lurking doubts in the breast of the executive, or" lastly--an argument of greater weight in a republic than it could have been under a monarchy,--the high respectability and political influence of the criminal's connections, had availed to mitigate his doom from death to perpetual imprisonment.
All in a moment through the gloom were seen Ten thousand Banners rise into the Air With Orient Colours waving: with them rose A Forrest huge of Spears: and thronging Helms Appear'd, and serried Shields in thick array Of depth immeasurable: Anon they move In perfect PHALANX to the Dorian mood Of Flutes and soft Recorders; such as rais'd To highth of noblest temper Hero's old Arming to Battel, and in stead of rage Deliberate valour breath'd, firm and unmov'd With dread of death to flight or foul retreat, Nor wanting power to mitigate and swage With solemn touches, troubl'd thoughts, and chase Anguish and doubt and fear and sorrow and pain From mortal or immortal minds.
Perhaps at this moment, envious of hers, thou art regarding her, either as she paces to and fro some gallery of her sumptuous palaces, or leans over some balcony, meditating how, whilst preserving her purity and greatness, she may mitigate the tortures this wretched heart of mine endures for her sake, what glory should recompense my sufferings, what repose my toil, and lastly what death my life, and what reward my services?
Franz had so managed his route, that during the ride to the Colosseum they passed not a single ancient ruin, so that no preliminary impression interfered to mitigate the colossal proportions of the gigantic building they came to admire.
Now, as the fact of becoming a prince from a private station presupposes either ability or fortune, it is clear that one or other of these things will mitigate in some degree many difficulties.
But there was the decorously grave, though unmoved physician, seeking only to mitigate the last pangs of the patient whom he could not save.
Clarke, considered the sentence too severe, and advised him to mitigate it; but he was inexorable.
He had known what it was to have utterly exhausted his credit, to be unable to raise a dollar, and to find himself at nightfall in a strange city, without a penny to mitigate its strangeness.
Oh, of course you will have to abide by the terms," I said; and she uttered nothing to mitigate the severity of this conclusion.
To watch from such a point of vantage the struggles of those less fortunate than ourselves--of the uninformed, the unprovided, the belated, the bewildered--is an occupation not devoid of sweetness, and there was nothing to mitigate the complacency with which our young friend gave himself up to it; nothing, that is, save a natural benevolence which had not yet been extinguished by the consciousness of official greatness.
They increase the cares of life; but they mitigate the remembrance of death.