mixing


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mix

 (mĭks)
v. mixed, mix·ing, mix·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To combine or blend into one mass or mixture: Mix the dry ingredients first.
b. To create or form by combining ingredients: mix a drink; mix cement.
c. To add (an ingredient or element) to another: mix an egg into batter.
2. To combine or join: mix joy with sorrow.
3. To bring into social contact: mix boys and girls in the classroom.
4. To produce (an organism) by crossbreeding.
5.
a. To combine (two or more audio tracks or channels) to produce a composite audio recording.
b. To produce (a soundtrack or recording) in this manner.
v.intr.
1.
a. To become combined or blended together: Stir until the eggs mix with the flour.
b. To be capable of being blended together: Oil does not mix with water.
2. To associate socially or get along with others: He does not mix well at parties.
3. To mate so as to produce a hybrid; crossbreed.
4. To become involved: In the case of a family argument, a friend should not mix in.
n.
1.
a. A combination of diverse elements: The downtown has a good mix of stores and restaurants.
b. A mixture of ingredients packaged and sold commercially: a cake mix.
c. A recording that is produced by combining and adjusting two or more audio tracks or channels.
2. An animal resulting from interbreeding, especially a dog or cat of mixed breed.
Phrasal Verbs:
mix down
To combine all of the audio components of a recording into a final soundtrack or mix.
mix up
1. To confuse; confound: His explanation just mixed me up more. I always mix up the twins.
2. To involve or implicate: He got himself mixed up with the wrong people.
Idiom:
mix it up Slang
To fight.

[Back-formation from Middle English mixt, mixed, mixed, from Anglo-Norman mixte, from Latin mixtus, past participle of miscēre, to mix; see meik- in Indo-European roots.]

mix′a·ble adj.
Synonyms: mix, blend, mingle, merge, amalgamate, coalesce, fuse2
These verbs mean to put into or come together in one mass so that constituent parts or elements are diffused or commingled. Mix is the least specific: The cook mixed eggs, flour, and sugar. Do work and play never mix? To blend is to mix intimately and harmoniously so that the components lose their original definition: The clerk blended mocha and java coffee beans. Snow-covered mountains blended into the clouds. Mingle implies combination without loss of individual characteristics: "Respect was mingled with surprise" (Sir Walter Scott)."His companions mingled freely and joyously with the natives" (Washington Irving).
Merge and amalgamate imply resultant homogeneity: Tradition and innovation are merged in this new composition. Twilight merged into night. "The four sentences of the original are amalgamated into two" (William Minto).
Coalesce implies a slow merging: Indigenous peoples and conquerors coalesced into the present-day population. Fuse emphasizes an enduring union, as that formed by heating metals: "He diffuses a tone and spirit of unity, that blends, and (as it were) fuses, each into each" (Samuel Taylor Coleridge).

mixing

(ˈmɪksɪŋ)
n
(Film) (in sound recording)
a. the balancing and adjusting of the recorded tracks on a multitrack tape machine
b. (as modifier): mixing equipment.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mixing - the act of mixing togethermixing - the act of mixing together; "paste made by a mix of flour and water"; "the mixing of sound channels in the recording studio"
compounding, combining, combination - the act of combining things to form a new whole
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Whenever the story was plain enough for Jurgis to make out, Antanas would have it repeated to him, and then he would remember it, prattling funny little sentences and mixing it up with other stories in an irresistible fashion.
Legree was just mixing himself a tumbler of punch, pouring his hot water from a cracked and broken-nosed pitcher, grumbling, as he did so,
We are on the brink of detection," proceeded the captain, carefully mixing his colors with liquid glue, and with a strong "drier" added from a bottle in his own possession.
It's much against the grain with me, I assure you, Copperfield, to be concerned in anything so unpleasant; but really, as it is, we're all mixing ourselves up with what oughtn't to be.
My sister, who had begun to be alarmingly meditative, had to employ herself actively in getting the gin, the hot water, the sugar, and the lemon-peel, and mixing them.
To him with swift ascent he up returnd, Into his blissful bosom reassum'd In glory as of old, to him appeas'd All, though all-knowing, what had past with Man Recounted, mixing intercession sweet.
The painter had been busy mixing his colours and getting his brushes ready.
My delight at the prospect of mixing once more with human beings was somewhat damped at the thought of the miserable object I must seem.
Mixing in the crowd, he noticed a stag-hound which the butchers had caught and tied to a post, and which was being flogged in a merciless manner.
Most certainly, senor," replied Sancho, "your worship shall be fully obeyed in this matter; all the more as of myself I am peaceful and no friend to mixing in strife and quarrels: it is true that as regards the defence of my own person I shall not give much heed to those laws, for laws human and divine allow each one to defend himself against any assailant whatever.
And Lycurgus, more true to his object, was under the necessity of mixing a portion of violence with the authority of superstition, and of securing his final success by a voluntary renunciation, first of his country, and then of his life.
I have thought of Lucy, and I shall not dishonour her by mixing the two.