mnemonics


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mne·mon·ics

 (nĭ-mŏn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
A system to develop or improve the memory.

mnemonics

(nɪˈmɒnɪks)
n (usually functioning as singular)
1. the art or practice of improving or of aiding the memory
2. (Education) a system of rules to aid the memory

mne•mon•ics

(nɪˈmɒn ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the process or technique of improving or developing the memory.
[1700–10]

mnemonics

the process or technique of improving, assisting, or developing the memory. Also called mnemotechnics. — mnemonic, adj.
See also: Memory

mnemonics

A code consisting of abbreviated instructions.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mnemonics - a method or system for improving the memorymnemonics - a method or system for improving the memory
method - a way of doing something, especially a systematic way; implies an orderly logical arrangement (usually in steps)
Translations
mnemotechnika

mnemonics

[nɪˈmɒnɪks] NSINGmnemotécnica f, nemotécnica f

mne·mon·ics

n. mnemónica, adiestramiento de la memoria por medio de asociación de ideas y otros recursos.
References in periodicals archive ?
One such teaching technique, which is the focus of this paper, is the use of mnemonics to teach auditing.
The authors, who include a recent successful test-taker, give students a range of methods to improve memorization, including topic facts and mnemonics (such as "Really Bad Calcification" for aortic stenosis, with the first letters standing for rheumatic heart disease, bicuspid aortic valve and calcified aortic valve).
Of course, the province of medical knowledge is not the sole arena for using mnemonics.
So, let's just relax and use our brains to learn more about mnemonics.
I believe that the only people who now make regular use of mnemonics are medical students, and there are even textbooks to teach them.
It is for this reason, Seris suggests, that Poliziano distances himself from the Ciceronian mnemonic model.
This change, which would incorporate an "E" onto the widely used "ABCD" mnemonic, emphasizes the importance of a historical component: enlargement or other changes over time.
The implied historical narrative underlying the book is not entirely clear: if we have lost the mnemonic tradition which was somehow our true memory, did this loss occur with the invention of the printing press (as the praise of medieval mnemonics and poetry games sometimes lead us to believe) or with the industrialization of modern society and today's "cybernetic culture" (as he suggests elsewhere)?
They have shown mnemonics to be very effective in facilitating this learning (see Mastropieri, Scruggs, & Levin, 1987, for a review; also Mastropieri, Scruggs, & Fulk, 1990; Scruggs, Mastropieri, McLoone, Levin, & Morrison, 1987).
The following mnemonics were developed over years of instructing and directing Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) courses.
Mnemonics is a way of organizing information, so it is easier to remember.
More important for the future, the three-dimensional model, with its thematic rooms linked by networks of hallways, may be a more congenial paradigm for a computer interface than a desktop full of windows and icons: it's easier to remember where you've put something in a "memory palace," or what's known in mnemonics as the "method of loci.