moat


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Related to moat: Economic Moat

moat

 (mōt)
n.
1. A deep wide ditch, usually filled with water, typically surrounding a fortified medieval town, fortress, or castle as a protection against assault.
2. A ditch similar to one surrounding a fortification: A moat separates the animals in the zoo from the spectators.
tr.v. moat·ed, moat·ing, moats
To surround with or as if with a moat.

[Middle English mote, mound, moat (since both mounds and moats form part of fortifications), from Old French, mound; akin to Medieval Latin mota, perhaps of Germanic origin and akin to English mud.]

moat

(məʊt)
n
(Fortifications) a wide water-filled ditch surrounding a fortified place, such as a castle
vb
(Fortifications) (tr) to surround with or as if with a moat
[C14: from Old French motte mound]

moat

(moʊt)

n.
1. a deep, wide trench, usu. filled with water, surrounding the rampart of a fortified place, as a town or a castle.
2. any similar trench, as one used for confining animals in a zoo.
[1325–75; Middle English mote mound, hill, ditch, moat < Old French, c. Old Provençal mota < pre-Latin *mutta]

moat

- From French mote/motte, meaning "mound."
See also related terms for mound.

moat


Past participle: moated
Gerund: moating

Imperative
moat
moat
Present
I moat
you moat
he/she/it moats
we moat
you moat
they moat
Preterite
I moated
you moated
he/she/it moated
we moated
you moated
they moated
Present Continuous
I am moating
you are moating
he/she/it is moating
we are moating
you are moating
they are moating
Present Perfect
I have moated
you have moated
he/she/it has moated
we have moated
you have moated
they have moated
Past Continuous
I was moating
you were moating
he/she/it was moating
we were moating
you were moating
they were moating
Past Perfect
I had moated
you had moated
he/she/it had moated
we had moated
you had moated
they had moated
Future
I will moat
you will moat
he/she/it will moat
we will moat
you will moat
they will moat
Future Perfect
I will have moated
you will have moated
he/she/it will have moated
we will have moated
you will have moated
they will have moated
Future Continuous
I will be moating
you will be moating
he/she/it will be moating
we will be moating
you will be moating
they will be moating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been moating
you have been moating
he/she/it has been moating
we have been moating
you have been moating
they have been moating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been moating
you will have been moating
he/she/it will have been moating
we will have been moating
you will have been moating
they will have been moating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been moating
you had been moating
he/she/it had been moating
we had been moating
you had been moating
they had been moating
Conditional
I would moat
you would moat
he/she/it would moat
we would moat
you would moat
they would moat
Past Conditional
I would have moated
you would have moated
he/she/it would have moated
we would have moated
you would have moated
they would have moated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.moat - ditch dug as a fortification and usually filled with watermoat - ditch dug as a fortification and usually filled with water
trench - a ditch dug as a fortification having a parapet of the excavated earth
Translations
خَنْدَقٌ مَائِيٌّخَنْدَق مَمْلوء بِالماء
hradní příkoppříkopvodní příkop
voldgrav
vallihauta
jarak
várárok
virkisgröf, kastaladíki
gynybinis griovys
aizsarggrāvisgrāvis
grachtslotgracht
vallgrav
คูน้ำรอบปราสาทหรือเมือง
hendekkale hendeği
hào

moat

[məʊt] Nfoso m

moat

[ˈməʊt] n [castle] → douves fpl

moat

nWassergraben m; (of castle also)Burggraben m

moat

[məʊt] nfossato

moat

(məut) noun
a deep ditch, dug round a castle etc, usually filled with water.

moat

خَنْدَقٌ مَائِيٌّ hradní příkop voldgrav Wassergraben τάφρος φρουρίου foso vallihauta douves jarak fosso gracht vollgrav fosa fosso крепостной ров vallgrav คูน้ำรอบปราสาทหรือเมือง hendek hào 护城河
References in classic literature ?
Instantly, Sir What's-his-name recovered himself, pitched the tyrant out of the window, and turned to join the lady, victorious, but with a bump on his brow, found the door locked, tore up the curtains, made a rope ladder, got halfway down when the ladder broke, and he went headfirst into the moat, sixty feet below.
And how strange is this marvel, and how awful -- that to the one per- ception it is enchanted and dight in a base and shame- ful aspect; yet to the perception of the other it is not enchanted, hath suffered no change, but stands firm and stately still, girt with its moat and waving its ban- ners in the blue air from its towers.
I believe the turbulent waves Swallow the last shipper and boat; She with her singing craves All to visit her magic moat.
Nothing to do but hitch your rope ladder to the battlements, shin down it, break your leg in the moat -- because a rope ladder is nineteen foot too short, you know -- and there's your horses and your trusty vassles, and they scoop you up and fling you across a saddle, and away you go to your native Langudoc, or Navarre, or wherever it is.
It was worth any money to see Wemmick waving a salute to me from the other side of the moat, when we might have shaken hands across it with the greatest ease.
Some two hundred feet below, a brawling upland stream stood for the moat, and for the enemy there was on the opposite side of the valley a great green company of trees, settled like a cloud slope upon slope, making all haste to cross the river and ascend the heights where I stood.
At this moment Gurth appeared on the opposite side of the moat with the mules.
At the door were standing two young women, girls of the district as they call them, on their way to Seville with some carriers who had chanced to halt that night at the inn; and as, happen what might to our adventurer, everything he saw or imaged seemed to him to be and to happen after the fashion of what he read of, the moment he saw the inn he pictured it to himself as a castle with its four turrets and pinnacles of shining silver, not forgetting the drawbridge and moat and all the belongings usually ascribed to castles of the sort.
Over the moat Will sprang, through the bushes and briars, across the swamp, over stocks and stones, up the woodland roads in long leaps like a scared jack rabbit.
He sat down by the side of the moat, buried his face in his hands and reflected.
The building rose from an island in the circling stream, so that this formed a perfect moat spanned by a two-arched bridge without a parapet.
In the centre of the great circus ring thus formed, was a torn and ragged upheaval a hundred feet high, all snowed over with a sulphur crust of many and many a brilliant and beautiful color, and the ditch inclosed this like the moat of a castle, or surrounded it as a little river does a little island, if the simile is better.