mock-heroic

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mock-he·ro·ic

(mŏk′hĭ-rō′ĭk)
n.
A satirical imitation or burlesque of the heroic manner or style.

mock′-he·ro′ic adj.
mock′-he·ro′i·cal·ly adv.

mock-heroic

adj
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (of a literary work, esp a poem) imitating the style of heroic poetry in order to satirize an unheroic subject, as in Pope's The Rape of the Lock
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) burlesque imitation of the heroic style or of a single work in this style

mock′-hero′ic



adj.
1. imitating or burlesquing that which is heroic, as in manner, character, or action.
2. satirizing the heroic style of literature: a mock-heroic poem.
3. a literary work written in mock-heroic style.
[1705–15]
mock′-hero′ically, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mock-heroic - a satirical imitation of heroic versemock-heroic - a satirical imitation of heroic verse
caricature, impersonation, imitation - a representation of a person that is exaggerated for comic effect
Translations

mock-heroic

[ˈmɒkhɪˈrəʊɪk] ADJheroicoburlesco
References in classic literature ?
I fancy, also, that I must by this time have read the Odyssey, for the "Battle of the Frogs and Mice" was in the second volume, and it took me so much that I paid it the tribute of a bald imitation in a mock-heroic epic of a cat fight, studied from the cat fights in our back yard, with the wonted invocation to the Muse, and the machinery of partisan gods and goddesses.
As frontier dramas experienced a resurgent boom in the 1870s (the antebellum period had seen the occasionally popular production), they were almost ubiquitously panned by critics as being low-class, nonliterary, unappealing failures of art; as one critic wrote about a hugely successful 1874 production called Across the Continent, such plays offered "so much trash, buncomb, spread-eagleism, morbidity, mock-heroics and coarseness that none but a strong and uneducated palate could relish the compound .
Gay saw how he could exploit his mastery of mock-heroics by setting a fashionable artistic genre in Newgate, which figured strongly in the gangsters' contest.