mocking


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mock

 (mŏk)
v. mocked, mock·ing, mocks
v.tr.
1.
a. To treat with ridicule or contempt; deride: was mocked for contradicting himself; mocked her superficial understanding of the issues. See Synonyms at ridicule.
b. To imitate in fun or derision: mocked his high-pitched voice.
c. To mimic or resemble closely: a whistle that mocks the call of seabirds.
2.
a. To frustrate the hopes or intentions of: "The massive blister mocked my efforts" (Willie Morris).
b. To cause to appear irrelevant, ineffectual, or impossible: "The Depression mocked the Puritan assumption that failure in life was the wages of sin when even the hardest-working, most pious husbands began to lose hope" (Walter McDougall).
v.intr.
To express scorn or ridicule; jeer: They mocked at the idea.
n.
1. The act of mocking.
2. An object of scorn or derision: became the mock of his associates.
adj.
Simulated; false; sham: a mock battle.
adv.
In an insincere or pretending manner: mock sorrowful.
Idiom:
make/a mock of
To subject to ridicule; mock.

[Middle English mokken, from Old French mocquer.]

mock′er n.
mock′ing·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.mocking - abusing vocallymocking - abusing vocally; expressing contempt or ridicule; "derisive laughter"; "a jeering crowd"; "her mocking smile"; "taunting shouts of `coward' and `sissy'"
disrespectful - exhibiting lack of respect; rude and discourteous; "remarks disrespectful of the law"; "disrespectful in the presence of his parents"; "disrespectful toward his teacher"
2.mocking - playfully vexing (especially by ridicule)mocking - playfully vexing (especially by ridicule); "his face wore a somewhat quizzical almost impertinent air"- Lawrence Durrell
playful - full of fun and high spirits; "playful children just let loose from school"

mocking

mocking

adjective
Contemptuous or ironic in manner or wit:
Translations
ساخِر، هازئ
uštěpačný
hånlig
hæîandi, spottandi

mocking

[ˈmɒkɪŋ]
A. ADJburlón, socarrón
B. Nburlas fpl

mocking

[ˈmɒkɪŋ] adj [smile, laughter] → moqueur/euse

mocking

adjspöttisch
nSpott m

mocking

[ˈmɒkɪŋ] adj (gen) → beffardo/a, derisorio/a, di scherno

mock

(mok) verb
to laugh at or cause to seem ridiculous. They mocked her efforts at cooking.
adjective
pretended or not real. a mock battle; He looked at me in mock horror.
ˈmockery noun
an act of making fun of something. She could not bear the mockery of the other children.
ˈmocking adjective
a mocking laugh.
ˈmockingly adverb
References in classic literature ?
You tell Matvey to do what can't be done, and go away yourself, leaving him to make a muddle of everything," and her habitual, mocking smile curved the corners of Dolly's lips as she spoke.
I turned from it with indifference, and brushing away the leaves from the tablet of the dead pagan restored to light the mocking words which, fresh from their long neglect, seemed to have a certain pathos.
On thy knees and draw the bow; bid the shrilling arrow go; In the empty, mocking thicket plunge the spear; But thy hands are loosed and weak, and the blood has left thy cheek-- It is Fear, O Little Hunter, it is Fear!