mockingly


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mock

 (mŏk)
v. mocked, mock·ing, mocks
v.tr.
1.
a. To treat with ridicule or contempt; deride: was mocked for contradicting himself; mocked her superficial understanding of the issues. See Synonyms at ridicule.
b. To imitate in fun or derision: mocked his high-pitched voice.
c. To mimic or resemble closely: a whistle that mocks the call of seabirds.
2.
a. To frustrate the hopes or intentions of: "The massive blister mocked my efforts" (Willie Morris).
b. To cause to appear irrelevant, ineffectual, or impossible: "The Depression mocked the Puritan assumption that failure in life was the wages of sin when even the hardest-working, most pious husbands began to lose hope" (Walter McDougall).
v.intr.
To express scorn or ridicule; jeer: They mocked at the idea.
n.
1. The act of mocking.
2. An object of scorn or derision: became the mock of his associates.
adj.
Simulated; false; sham: a mock battle.
adv.
In an insincere or pretending manner: mock sorrowful.
Idiom:
make/a mock of
To subject to ridicule; mock.

[Middle English mokken, from Old French mocquer.]

mock′er n.
mock′ing·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.mockingly - in a disrespectful jeering mannermockingly - in a disrespectful jeering manner  
2.mockingly - in a disrespectful and mocking manner; "`Sorry,' she repeated derisively"
Translations
بصورةٍ ساخِرَه
posměšně
hånligt
háîuglega
alaycı bir şekilde

mockingly

[ˈmɒkɪŋlɪ] ADV [say] → en tono burlón, con sorna; [smile, look] → burlonamente, con sorna

mockingly

advspöttisch, voller Spott; she mockingly repeated his wordssie äffte seine Worte nach

mockingly

[ˈmɒkɪŋlɪ] adv (smile) → beffardamente; (speak) → con tono di scherno

mock

(mok) verb
to laugh at or cause to seem ridiculous. They mocked her efforts at cooking.
adjective
pretended or not real. a mock battle; He looked at me in mock horror.
ˈmockery noun
an act of making fun of something. She could not bear the mockery of the other children.
ˈmocking adjective
a mocking laugh.
ˈmockingly adverb
References in classic literature ?
Come, Prince," she cried mockingly, "it was only a week ago that you assured me that my husband could not leave America.
she cried mockingly, 'you would fetch your dearest, but the beautiful bird sits no longer singing in the nest; the cat has got it, and will scratch out your eyes as well.
said one of the soldiers, winking and turning mockingly to Ramballe.
I remember how mockingly bright the day seemed as I went back on my melancholy pilgrimage to the little house at Woking, how busy the streets and vivid the moving life about me.
At that moment, when the revelation of everything was hanging over him, there was nothing he expected so much as that she would answer mockingly as before that his suspicions were absurd and utterly groundless.
Lop-Ear chattered mockingly at me, and, springing upon me unseen, tumbled me over.
45-52) But upon Aphrodite herself Zeus cast sweet desire to be joined in love with a mortal man, to the end that, very soon, not even she should be innocent of a mortal's love; lest laughter-loving Aphrodite should one day softly smile and say mockingly among all the gods that she had joined the gods in love with mortal women who bare sons of death to the deathless gods, and had mated the goddesses with mortal men.
Some hoarse sounds meant for this, came mockingly out of her at last; and her head dropped forward on her breast.
she replied mockingly, as he placed the song before her.
This was a drama of love, not of conscience, Razumov continued to himself mockingly.
Sophronia,' asked her husband, mockingly, 'are you sentimental?
Four times he stopped, and as many times did his laughter break out afresh with the same violence as at first, whereat Don Quixote grew furious, above all when he heard him say mockingly, "Thou must know, friend Sancho, that of Heaven's will I was born in this our iron age to revive in it the golden or age of gold; I am he for whom are reserved perils, mighty achievements, valiant deeds;" and here he went on repeating the words that Don Quixote uttered the first time they heard the awful strokes.