modalistic

modalistic

(ˌməʊdəˈlɪstɪk)
adj
(Theology) another word for modalist2
References in periodicals archive ?
Rahner's modalistic, anhypostatic view of the Trinity has fallen into the postmodern trap of making the Trinity into a set of relationships and lost the subsistent Persons who have those relationships.
Morgan discusses Sabellianism, based on modalistic Monarchiansim and also leading to Patripassianism.
Saul," fit for modalistic godhead: mountainous invincibility,
He suggests that contemporary hermeneutics could interpret trinitarian doctrine as a series of roles played by God--thereby affirming modalistic monarchianism, which trinitarian thought explicitly repudiated.
It is useful, if not necessary, to affirm the traditional axiom that "the external work of the Trinity is undivided" so that our missional practices are not engendered by tritheistic or modalistic theologies.
Modalistic monarchianism was a widely accepted solution to this problem.
The limitation of this control is that Origen never names his modalistic opponents, and Hagemann's argument, and mine, therefore, is possible only by juxtaposing Origen's remarks with what Hippolytus has said about Callistus' doctrine.
This heresy has a third name, Monarchianism, sometimes called Modalistic, Monarchianism, because it asserts the unity of God.
More precisely, at the very time that rabbis are labeling Jewish binitarian theologies as minut, Justin is "othering" a modalistic view of the Logos by refusing to claim it as Christian and even (at 1 Apol.
Carl Andresen (Logos und Nomos: Die Polemik des Kelsos wider das Christentum [Berlin: de Gruyter, 1955] 336) and Trakatellis (Pre-Existence of Christ 35) both speak of "some specific Jewish modalistic speculations" (
44) Alternately, the Sabellian charge--that without a modalistic understanding of the Trinity Christianity inescapably ascribes to tritheism--was shown to be unfounded in that hypostatic relationships spring from the Father, who is the source of the Godhead.
The point of Origen's lengthy exegesis of John 1: 1-2 seems to have been primarily to refute the Monarchian view of God, especially that called the modalistic view, which did not hold to any real distinction or separation between God the Father and God the Son.