mode


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Related to mode: range

mode

 (mōd)
n.
1.
a. A manner, way, or method of doing something, experiencing something, or acting: modern modes of travel; modes of consciousness; modes of affection. See Synonyms at method.
b. A particular form or kind: The building has multiple modes of egress.
c. A given condition of functioning; a status or operation: The spacecraft was in its recovery mode.
2. The current or customary fashion or style: a hat in the latest mode.
3. Music
a. Any of certain fixed arrangements of the diatonic tones of an octave, as the major and minor scales of Western music.
b. A patterned arrangement, as the one characteristic of the music of classical Greece or the medieval Christian Church.
4. Philosophy The particular appearance, form, or manner in which an underlying substance, or a permanent aspect or attribute of it, is manifested.
5. Logic
a. See modality.
b. The arrangement or order of the propositions in a syllogism according to both quality and quantity.
6. Statistics The value or item occurring most frequently in a series of observations or statistical data.
7. Mathematics The number or range of numbers in a set that occurs the most frequently.
8. Geology The mineral composition of an igneous rock expressed in terms of percentage of the total sample weight or volume.
9. Physics Any of numerous patterns of wave motion or vibration.
10. Grammar Mood.

[Middle English, tune, from Latin modus, manner, tune. Sense 2, French, from Old French, fashion, manner, from Latin modus; see med- in Indo-European roots.]

mode

(məʊd)
n
1. a manner or way of doing, acting, or existing
2. (Clothing & Fashion) the current fashion or style
3. (Music, other) music
a. any of the various scales of notes within one octave, esp any of the twelve natural diatonic scales taken in ascending order used in plainsong, folk song, and art music until 1600
b. (in the music of classical Greece) any of the descending diatonic scales from which the liturgical modes evolved
c. either of the two main scale systems in music since 1600: major mode; minor mode.
4. (Logic) logic linguistics another name for modality3, mood22
5. (Linguistics) logic linguistics another name for modality3, mood22
6. (Philosophy) philosophy a complex combination of ideas the realization of which is not determined by the component ideas
7. (Statistics) that one of a range of values that has the highest frequency as determined statistically. Compare mean34, median6
8. (Geological Science) the quantitative mineral composition of an igneous rock
9. (General Physics) physics one of the possible configurations of a travelling or stationary wave
10. (General Physics) physics one of the fundamental vibrations
[C14: from Latin modus measure, manner]

mode1

(moʊd)

n.
1. a manner of acting or doing; method; way: modes of transportation.
2. a particular type or form of something: Heat is a mode of motion.
3. a designated condition or status, as for performing a task or responding to a problem: a machine in the automatic mode.
4. Philos. appearance, form, or disposition taken by a thing, or by one of its essential properties or attributes.
5.
b. any of the forms of categorical syllogisms according to the quantity and quality of their constituent propositions.
6. any of various arrangements of the diatonic tones of an octave, differing from one another in the order of the whole steps and half steps; scale.
8. Statistics. the value of the variate at which a maximum occurs in the frequency distribution of the variate.
9. the actual mineral composition of a rock, expressed in percentages by weight.
[1250–1300; (< Old French) < Latin modus amount, limit, manner]

mode2

(moʊd)

n.
1. fashion or style in manners, dress, etc.
2. a light gray or drab color.
[1635–45; < French < Latin modus; see mode1]

mode

(mōd)
The value that occurs most frequently in a data set. For example, in the set 125, 140, 172, 164, 140, 110, the mode is 140. Compare arithmetic mean, average, median.

mode

  • comportment, deportment - Deportment adds the sense of action or activity to a mode of conduct or behavior; comportment, "behavior or bearing," does not have this.
  • dictionary - Based on Latin dictio(n-), "mode of expression" or "word," then dictionarius, "a repertory of words or phrases."
  • diet - Comes from Greek diaita, "a way of life, mode of living."
  • mode - Originally a tune or air and later a scheme of sounds.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mode - how something is done or how it happensmode - how something is done or how it happens; "her dignified manner"; "his rapid manner of talking"; "their nomadic mode of existence"; "in the characteristic New York style"; "a lonely way of life"; "in an abrasive fashion"
property - a basic or essential attribute shared by all members of a class; "a study of the physical properties of atomic particles"
artistic style, idiom - the style of a particular artist or school or movement; "an imaginative orchestral idiom"
drape - the manner in which fabric hangs or falls; "she adjusted the drape of her skirt"
fit - the manner in which something fits; "I admired the fit of her coat"
form - a particular mode in which something is manifested; "his resentment took the form of extreme hostility"
life style, lifestyle, life-style, modus vivendi - a manner of living that reflects the person's values and attitudes
setup - the way something is organized or arranged; "it takes time to learn the setup around here"
signature, touch - a distinguishing style; "this room needs a woman's touch"
wise - a way of doing or being; "in no wise"; "in this wise"
response - the manner in which an electrical or mechanical device responds to an input signal or a range of input signals
2.mode - a particular functioning condition or arrangementmode - a particular functioning condition or arrangement; "switched from keyboard to voice mode"
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
3.mode - a classification of propositions on the basis of whether they claim necessity or possibility or impossibility
logical relation - a relation between propositions
4.mode - verb inflections that express how the action or state is conceived by the speaker
grammatical relation - a linguistic relation established by grammar
common mood, declarative, declarative mood, fact mood, indicative, indicative mood - a mood (grammatically unmarked) that represents the act or state as an objective fact
subjunctive, subjunctive mood - a mood that represents an act or state (not as a fact but) as contingent or possible
optative, optative mood - a mood (as in Greek or Sanskrit) that expresses a wish or hope; expressed in English by modal verbs
imperative, imperative form, imperative mood, jussive mood - a mood that expresses an intention to influence the listener's behavior
interrogative mood, interrogative - some linguists consider interrogative sentences to constitute a mood
5.mode - any of various fixed orders of the various diatonic notes within an octavemode - any of various fixed orders of the various diatonic notes within an octave
diatonic scale - a scale with eight notes in an octave; all but two are separated by whole tones
church mode, ecclesiastical mode, Gregorian mode, medieval mode - any of a system of modes used in Gregorian chants up until 1600; derived historically from the Greek mode
Greek mode - any of the descending diatonic scales in the music of classical Greece
major diatonic scale, major scale - a diatonic scale with notes separated by whole tones except for the 3rd and 4th and 7th and 8th
minor diatonic scale, minor scale - a diatonic scale with notes separated by whole tones except for the 2nd and 3rd and 5th and 6th
6.mode - the most frequent value of a random variable
statistics - a branch of applied mathematics concerned with the collection and interpretation of quantitative data and the use of probability theory to estimate population parameters
average, norm - a statistic describing the location of a distribution; "it set the norm for American homes"

mode

noun
2. fashion, style, trend, rage, vogue, look, craze Their designs were exterminated by the mode for uncluttered space.
3. function, position, role, operation, capacity The camera is in manual mode.

mode

noun
1. The approach used to do something:
2. A distinctive way of expressing oneself:
3. Manner of being or form of existence:
4. The current custom:
Informal: thing.
Idioms: the in thing, the last word, the latest thing.
Translations
طَريقَه، شَكْل، أسْلوبموضَه، طِرازوَسيلَه، طَريقَه
druhmódamoduszpůsob
=-mådemådemode
režiimviis
háttur, mátitegund, gerîtíska
stileiviškas
modeveids

mode

[məʊd] N
1. (= way, manner) → manera f, modo m
2. (= fashion) → moda f
3. (Comput) → función f, modalidad f

mode

[ˈməʊd] n
[life, behaviour] → mode m
(= setting) to be in manual mode [camera] → être en mode manuel
when the camera is in manual mode → lorsque l'appareil photo est en mode manuel
to be in survival mode (= thinking only of survival) [person, organization] → être en mode survie
to be in panic mode (= be panicking) [person] → être en proie à la panique
(= type) → mode m
the capitalist mode of production → le mode de production capitaliste
mode of dress → mode vestimentaire mode of transport

mode

n
(Gram) → Modus m; (Mus) → Tonart f; (Philos) → Modalität f
(= way)Art f(und Weise); (= form)Form f; mode of transportTransportmittel nt; mode of lifeLebensweise f; (Biol) → Lebensform f; mode of addressAnrede f
(Fashion) → Mode f; to be the modein Mode sein
(Comput) → Modus m

mode

[məʊd] n
a. (gen) → modo, maniera; (of transport) → mezzo (Mus) → modo (Comput) → modalità f inv
b. (fashion) (Math) → moda

mode

(məud) noun
1. a manner of doing something. an unusual mode of expression.
2. a kind or type. modes of transport.
3. a fashion. Large hats are the latest mode.
ˈmodish adjective
fashionable and smart.
ˈmodishly adverb

mode

1. n. moda, manera, valor repetido con mayor frecuencia en una serie;
2. modo.
References in classic literature ?
She likewise set up housekeeping in the sideboard, and managed a microscopic cooking stove with a skill that brought tears of pride to Hannah's eyes, while Demi learned his letters with his grandfather, who invented a new mode of teaching the alphabet by forming letters with his arms and legs, thus uniting gymnastics for head and heels.
To this she would reply that unless he changed his mode of life, she would certainly outlive him.
The mode of his death, too, affects the mind differently, in our day, from what it did a century and a half ago.
In accomplishing the main purpose, it has appeared allowable, by a few extra touches, to give a faint representation of a mode of life not heretofore described, together with some of the characters that move in it, among whom the author happened to make one.
Brom, who had a degree of rough chivalry in his nature, would fain have carried matters to open warfare and have settled their pretensions to the lady, according to the mode of those most concise and simple reasoners, the knights-errant of yore, -- by single combat; but lchabod was too conscious of the superior might of his adversary to enter the lists against him; he had overheard a boast of Bones, that he would "double the schoolmaster up, and lay him on a shelf of his own schoolhouse;" and he was too wary to give him an opportunity.
But perhaps the mere crossing of Siberia in a sledge drawn by dogs as Ledyard did, or the taking a long solitary walk on an empty stomach, in the negro heart of Africa, which was the sum of poor Mungo's performances -- this kind of travel, I say, may not be the very best mode of attaining a high social polish.
Is the duke so very poor as to be forced to this desperate mode of getting a livelihood?
At each end of the fireplace sat a long-legged gentleman, with his chair tipped back, his hat on his head, and the heels of his muddy boots reposing sublimely on the mantel-piece,--a position, we will inform our readers, decidedly favorable to the turn of reflection incident to western taverns, where travellers exhibit a decided preference for this particular mode of elevating their understandings.
The government itself, which is only the mode which the people have chosen to execute their will, is equally liable to be abused and perverted before the people can act through it.
This being his mode of attack, it was never safe to stop a single minute.
She must know as well as her father, how acceptable an instrument would be; and perhaps the mode of it, the mystery, the surprize, is more like a young woman's scheme than an elderly man's.
But that was not enough; for when people are determined on a mode of conduct which they know to be wrong, they feel injured by the expectation of any thing better from them.