moderated


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mod·er·ate

 (mŏd′ər-ĭt)
adj.
1. Being within reasonable limits; not excessive or extreme: a moderate price.
2. Not violent or subject to extremes; mild or calm; temperate: a moderate climate.
3.
a. Of medium or average quantity or extent.
b. Of limited or average quality; mediocre.
4. Opposed to radical or extreme views or measures, especially in politics or religion.
n.
One who holds or champions moderate views or opinions, especially in politics or religion.
v. (mŏd′ə-rāt′) mod·er·at·ed, mod·er·at·ing, mod·er·ates
v.tr.
1. To cause to be less extreme, intense, or violent.
2. To preside over: She was chosen to moderate the convention.
v.intr.
1. To become less extreme, intense, or violent; abate.
2. To act as a moderator.

[Middle English moderat, from Latin moderātus, past participle of moderārī, to moderate; see med- in Indo-European roots.]

mod′er·ate·ly adv.
mod′er·ate·ness n.
mod′er·a′tion n.
Synonyms: moderate, qualify, temper
These verbs mean to make less extreme or intense: moderated the severity of his rebuke by remaining calm; qualified her criticism by noting some strong points; tempered my harsh comments before writing the report.
Antonym: intensify
Translations

moderated

a. moderado-a, mesurado-a; [price] módico, [weather] templado;
___ temperaturetemperatura ___.
References in classic literature ?
The fall might have killed him, had it not been broken and moderated by his clothes catching in the branches of a large tree; but he came down with some force, however,--more than was at all agreeable or convenient.
I begun to lay for a chance; I reckoned I would sneak out and go for the woods till the weather moderated.
When the noise had moderated a little, the chair proposed that "our illustrious guests be at once elected, by complimentary acclamation, to membership in our ever-glorious organization, the paradise of the free and the perdition of the slave.
Vanstone's shoulders -- and then moderated his neighbor's parental enthusiasm from the point of view of an impartial spectator.
Still calling at intervals, but now with a moderated voice, he made the hasty circuit of the garden, and finding neither man nor trace of man in all its evergreen coverts, turned at last to the house.
The Abraham Lincoln, not being able to struggle with such velocity, had moderated its pace, and sailed at half speed.
On her side, Milady tried to encourage Felton in his project; but at the first words which issued from her mouth, she plainly saw that the young fanatic stood more in need of being moderated than urged.
In the first case this liberality is dangerous, in the second it is very necessary to be considered liberal; and Caesar was one of those who wished to become pre-eminent in Rome; but if he had survived after becoming so, and had not moderated his expenses, he would have destroyed his government.
Such was the home which was to put Mansfield out of her head, and teach her to think of her cousin Edmund with moderated feelings.
I was saying, monsieur le comte," resumed Buckingham, in a tone of anger more marked than ever, although in some measure moderated by the presence of an equal, "I was saying that it is impossible these tents can remain where they are.
As the wind had moderated, the ship stood near to the land, so as to command a view of the river's mouth.
It appeared unutterably rash, though when hit upon, it had been a decision that moderated a more extreme action.

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