modernism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mod·ern·ism

 (mŏd′ər-nĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. Modern thought, character, or practice.
b. Sympathy with or conformity to modern ideas, practices, or standards.
2. A peculiarity of usage or style, as of a word or phrase, that is characteristic of modern times.
3. often Modernism The deliberate departure from tradition and the use of innovative forms of expression that distinguish many styles in the arts and literature of the 1900s.
4. often Modernism A Roman Catholic movement, officially condemned in 1907, that attempted to examine traditional belief according to contemporary philosophy, criticism, and historiography.

mod′ern·ist n.
mod′ern·is′tic adj.

modernism

(ˈmɒdəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. modern tendencies, characteristics, thoughts, etc, or the support of these
2. something typical of contemporary life or thought
3. (Art Movements) a 20th-century divergence in the arts from previous traditions, esp in architecture. See International Style
4. (Architecture) a 20th-century divergence in the arts from previous traditions, esp in architecture. See International Style
5. (Roman Catholic Church) (capital) RC Church the movement at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries that sought to adapt doctrine to the supposed requirements of modern thought
ˈmodernist n, adj
ˌmodernˈistic adj
ˌmodernˈistically adv

mod•ern•ism

(ˈmɒd ərˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. modern character, tendencies, or values.
2. a modern usage or characteristic.
3. (cap.)
a. the movement in Roman Catholic thought that interpreted the teachings of the Church in the light of modern philosophic and scientific thought.
b. the liberal theological tendency in 20th-century Protestantism.
4. (sometimes cap.) estrangement or divergence from the past in the arts and literature occurring esp. in the course of the 20th century and taking form in any of various innovative movements and styles.
[1730–40]
mod′ern•ist, n., adj.
mod`ern•is′tic, adj.

modernism

a mode of expression or practice characteristic of modern times. — modernist, n.modernistic, adj.
See also: Art
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.modernism - genre of art and literature that makes a self-conscious break with previous genresmodernism - genre of art and literature that makes a self-conscious break with previous genres
genre - a class of art (or artistic endeavor) having a characteristic form or technique
2.modernism - the quality of being current or of the presentmodernism - the quality of being current or of the present; "a shopping mall would instill a spirit of modernity into this village"
currentness, up-to-dateness, currency - the property of belonging to the present time; "the currency of a slang term"
3.modernism - practices typical of contemporary life or thought
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
Translations

modernism

[ˈmɒdənɪzəm] Nmodernismo m

modernism

nModernismus m

modernism

[ˈmɒdənɪzəm] n (Art) → modernismo
References in classic literature ?
She was expressing in her own native phrases--assisted a little by her Sixth Standard training--feelings which might almost have been called those of the age--the ache of modernism.
On his study table--a curious note of modernism where everything seemed to belong to a bygone world--was a cablegram.
Dance all too frequently drops out of discussions of this seminal epoch, yet as Karl Toepfer's fascinating study Empire of Ecstasy demonstrates, dance is a well-suited medium for exploring the complex impulses and cultural constellations that comprised modernism.
The Second Battlefield: Women, Modernism, and the First World War.
The profusion of books, articles, Quranic exegesis, and treatises produced by such harbingers of Islamic modernism as Sayyid Jamal ad-Din al-Afghani, Muhammad Abduh, Muhammad Farid Wajdi, Qasim Amin and Ali Abd al-Raziq on historically significant issues not only generated a storm of controversy in Egypt but also affected the general course of the country's intellectual development.
A POTENT CRITICAL examination of the scholarship on the modern Arabic novel in the Levant (Lebanon, Syria, and Palestine), Stefan Meyer's volume sets out to question the concepts of modernity and modernism as they are applied in Arabic through careful reading of major novels published since the 1960s.
Halpern's agenda is, with Shakespeare as touchstone, to redeem modernism as less disjunctive with the postmodern than is often thought, and to reveal its common link with the self-awareness, complexity, and the social significance of contemporary theory.
The Subject of Modernism addresses a problem most academic readers of literature will find familiar: the use of contemporary theoretical approaches to read historical texts - a practice devoted historians have tended to reject out of hand.
Christopher Butler conceives of early modernism as an ensemble in which the media mutually influence one another.
MacKay describes the connections between modernist literary culture and the virtually continuous public violence from the late 19th century to the early Cold War, the famous Age of Anxiety in which modernism found itself institutionalized.
The conventional narrative established in the history of interwar Germany and in the history of art has it that Hitler's seizure of power marked a brutal caesura between an ultra-laissez-faire society hosting modernist experiments in every realm of culture and society, and an ultra-totalitarian one hostile to modernism to the point of persecuting it as if it were an ethnic group considered subhuman, and thus to be mocked, persecuted, banned, removed from society, forced into migration, and even physically exterminated.
At the moment, it appears that pre-modern (to 1650) was contested by modernism (until 1950) and at the moment we live in a post-modern society and this last one is now becoming undone in 2015 or slightly before.