modernism


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Related to modernism: postmodernism, Modernism and postmodernism, Post Modernism

mod·ern·ism

 (mŏd′ər-nĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. Modern thought, character, or practice.
b. Sympathy with or conformity to modern ideas, practices, or standards.
2. A peculiarity of usage or style, as of a word or phrase, that is characteristic of modern times.
3. often Modernism The deliberate departure from tradition and the use of innovative forms of expression that distinguish many styles in the arts and literature of the 1900s.
4. often Modernism A Roman Catholic movement, officially condemned in 1907, that attempted to examine traditional belief according to contemporary philosophy, criticism, and historiography.

mod′ern·ist n.
mod′ern·is′tic adj.

modernism

(ˈmɒdəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. modern tendencies, characteristics, thoughts, etc, or the support of these
2. something typical of contemporary life or thought
3. (Art Movements) a 20th-century divergence in the arts from previous traditions, esp in architecture. See International Style
4. (Architecture) a 20th-century divergence in the arts from previous traditions, esp in architecture. See International Style
5. (Roman Catholic Church) (capital) RC Church the movement at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries that sought to adapt doctrine to the supposed requirements of modern thought
ˈmodernist n, adj
ˌmodernˈistic adj
ˌmodernˈistically adv

mod•ern•ism

(ˈmɒd ərˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. modern character, tendencies, or values.
2. a modern usage or characteristic.
3. (cap.)
a. the movement in Roman Catholic thought that interpreted the teachings of the Church in the light of modern philosophic and scientific thought.
b. the liberal theological tendency in 20th-century Protestantism.
4. (sometimes cap.) estrangement or divergence from the past in the arts and literature occurring esp. in the course of the 20th century and taking form in any of various innovative movements and styles.
[1730–40]
mod′ern•ist, n., adj.
mod`ern•is′tic, adj.

modernism

a mode of expression or practice characteristic of modern times. — modernist, n.modernistic, adj.
See also: Art
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.modernism - genre of art and literature that makes a self-conscious break with previous genresmodernism - genre of art and literature that makes a self-conscious break with previous genres
genre - a class of art (or artistic endeavor) having a characteristic form or technique
2.modernism - the quality of being current or of the presentmodernism - the quality of being current or of the present; "a shopping mall would instill a spirit of modernity into this village"
currentness, up-to-dateness, currency - the property of belonging to the present time; "the currency of a slang term"
3.modernism - practices typical of contemporary life or thought
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
Translations

modernism

[ˈmɒdənɪzəm] Nmodernismo m

modernism

nModernismus m

modernism

[ˈmɒdənɪzəm] n (Art) → modernismo
References in classic literature ?
She was expressing in her own native phrases--assisted a little by her Sixth Standard training--feelings which might almost have been called those of the age--the ache of modernism.
On his study table--a curious note of modernism where everything seemed to belong to a bygone world--was a cablegram.
Critique: As informed and informative as it is flawless in the production values of the profusion of full color artworks, ""Russian Modernism: Cross-Currents of German and Russian Art, 1907-1917" is a critically important and highly recommended addition to professional, community, and academic library 20th Century Art History reference collections in general, and Russian Modernism Art History supplemental studies reading lists in particular.
Roman Catholic Modernism was more than a number of intellectual and political tendencies that surfaced in the Church during the belle epoque and less than the consciously coordinated movement asserted by the Vatican condemnation in the encyclical Pascendi dominici gregis (1907).
of Pennsylvania) provides an introductory essay discussing the conceptualization of modernism and its scope.
This abundance of scholarship has been fueled in no small part by the adoption of a more expansive definition of the term itself, to the point where it no longer makes sense to talk of modernism as a singular, cohesive enterprise.
Decolonizing modernism goes beyond celebrating the advantages of marginality; it involves a historiographical revision of that relationship between Joyce and Spanish American writers in order to build "an ex-centric web of literary relations, a system of communicating vessels that crisscross as they circumnavigate privileged centres" (6).
With "The Intelligent Woman's Guide to a Modern American Conservatism"-published in The New Right Papers in 1982 and previewed in NR a few months earlier-Hart split with tradition and declared himself on the side of modernism in art, literature, and morals.
James Smethurst's The African American Roots of Modernism is an impressively thorough and provocative account of the impact of African American literature on modernism in the United States.
It is easier to recognize Modernism than to define it.
In this small volume on modernism, Christopher Butler brings together examples from literature, music and fine arts to kindle reader's interest in this broad and highly debated subject.
The new edition in 2009 (first edition in 1995) includes discussions of recent interest in modernisms, its developments in the United States, and an additional chapter on African-American modernism.