modesty


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mod·es·ty

 (mŏd′ĭ-stē)
n.
1. The state or quality of being moderate in the estimation of one's own abilities, accomplishments, or value.
2. Reserve or propriety in speech, dress, or behavior: Modesty prevented her from wearing that dress.
3. The state of being unostentatious or moderate in size, quantity, or range: the modesty of the room's furnishings.

modesty

(ˈmɒdɪstɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the quality or condition of being modest
2. (Clothing & Fashion) (modifier) designed to prevent inadvertent exposure of part of the body: a modesty flap.

mod•es•ty

(ˈmɒd ə sti)

n.
1. regard for decency of behavior, speech, dress, etc.
2. lack of vanity.
[1525–35; < Latin modestia. See modest, -y3]

Modesty

 

See Also: MEEKNESS, PERSONAL TRAITS

  1. As humbly as a guest who knows himself too late —Hart Crane
  2. Humility is like underwear, essential but indecent if it shows —Helen Nielsen, Reader’s Digest, March, 1959
  3. If you really were a hero … you made it sound routine and unglamorous, like shrugging off a ninety-yard touchdown run as “Good luck and good blocking” —Dan Wakefield
  4. I looked as if I were trying to melt into the scenery and become invisible, like a giraffe standing motionless among sunlit leaves —Christopher Isherwood
  5. Modest as a flower —Ella Wheeler Wilcox
  6. Modest as justice —William Shakespeare
  7. Modesty is like virtue; suspected only when it is advertised —Douglas Malloch
  8. Modesty like a diver gathers pearls by keeping his head low —Punch
  9. Modesty’s at times its own reward, like virtue —Lord Byron
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.modesty - freedom from vanity or conceitmodesty - freedom from vanity or conceit  
decency - the quality of conforming to standards of propriety and morality
Grundyism, primness, prudery, prudishness - excessive or affected modesty
immodesty - the trait of being vain and conceited
2.modesty - formality and propriety of mannermodesty - formality and propriety of manner  
correctitude, properness, propriety - correct or appropriate behavior
demureness - the trait of behaving with reserve and decorum

modesty

noun
2. plainness, simplicity, ordinariness, unpretentiousness, inexpensiveness The modesty of the town itself comes as a surprise.
3. decorum, virtue, decency, delicacy, propriety, sobriety, coyness, demureness, decorousness, seemliness, chasteness There were shrieks as the girls tried to protect their modesty.
Quotations
"Small is the worth"
"Of beauty from the light retir'd;"
"Bid her come forth,"
"Suffer herself to be desir'd,"
"And not blush so to be admir'd" [Edmund Waller Go Lovely Rose!]

modesty

noun
1. Lack of vanity or self-importance:
2. Reserve in speech, behavior, or dress:
3. The condition of being chaste:
Translations
تَواضُع
skromnostmírnost
beskedenhed
häveliäisyyskainoussäädyllisyysvaatimattomuus
čednostskromnost
hæverska; lítillæti
skromnost
čednostskromnostскромностчедност
alçakgönüllülük

modesty

[ˈmɒdɪstɪ] N
1. (= humbleness) → modestia f
in all modesty, I think I could do the job bettermodestamente or con toda modestia, creo yo que podría hacer mejor el trabajo
I can't tell you, modesty forbidsno puedo decírtelo, pecaría de poco modesto
see also false A3
2. (= propriety) → pudor m, recato m

modesty

[ˈmɒdɪsti] n
(= absence of pride) → modestie f
[price] → caractère m raisonnable
to protect one's modesty (= decency) → protéger sa pudeur

modesty

n
(= humbleness)Bescheidenheit f; in all modestybei aller Bescheidenheit; the modesty of the man! (iro)der ist ja überhaupt nicht von sich eingenommen! (iro inf)
(= moderation)Bescheidenheit f, → Genügsamkeit f; (of price)Mäßigkeit f
(= chasteness)Schamgefühl nt; (in behaviour) → Anstand m, → Sittsamkeit f (geh), → Züchtigkeit f (old); (in dress) → Unauffälligkeit f, → Dezentheit f

modesty

[ˈmɒdɪstɪ] nmodestia
in all modesty → in tutta modestia

modest

(ˈmodist) adjective
1. not having, or showing, too high an opinion of one's abilities etc. He's very modest about his success.
2. decent, or showing good taste; not shocking. modest clothing.
3. not very large; moderate. She's a person of modest ambitions.
ˈmodestly adverb
ˈmodesty noun
References in classic literature ?
There is not much danger that real talent or goodness will be overlooked long, even if it is, the consciousness of possessing and using it well should satisfy one, and the great charm of all power is modesty.
After simpering in a small way, like one whose modesty prohibited a more open expression of his admiration of a witticism that was perfectly unintelligible to his hearers, he continued, "It is not prudent for any one of my profession to be too familiar with those he has to instruct; for which reason I follow not the line of the army; besides which, I conclude that a gentleman of your character has the best judgment in matters of wayfaring; I have, therefore, decided to join company, in order that the ride may be made agreeable, and partake of social communion.
There it rose, a little withdrawn from the line of the street, but in pride, not modesty.
You do know, you dear thing," I replied; "only you haven't my dreadful boldness of mind, and you keep back, out of timidity and modesty and delicacy, even the impression that, in the past, when you had, without my aid, to flounder about in silence, most of all made you miserable.
But we don't quite fancy, when women and ministers come out broad and square, and go beyond us in matters of either modesty or morals, that's a fact.
The hum- blest hello-girl along ten thousand miles of wire could teach gentleness, patience, modesty, manners, to the highest duchess in Arthur's land.
It may be so, it is not for me to say; modesty is the best policy, I think.
She was a pretty creature, and she and her willow bough made a very pretty picture, and one which could not offend the modesty of the most fastidious spectator.
Jones made his little speech, in which he thanked the widow for the honor she was doing himself and his sons, but said that there was another person whose modesty --
Emma was in the humour to value simplicity and modesty to the utmost; and all that was amiable, all that ought to be attaching, seemed on Harriet's side, not her own.
The gentleman offered his services; and perceiving that her modesty declined what her situation rendered necessary, took her up in his arms without farther delay, and carried her down the hill.
They have had their shameful rights, these Nobles, in the modesty and virtue of our sisters, many years, but we have had good girls among us.