mogul


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Related to mogul: Mogul empire

mo·gul 1

 (mō′gəl)
n.
1. A small hard mound of snow on a ski slope, cast up over numerous runs by the skis of skiers as they turn.
2. One of a set of closely spaced, artificially constructed mounds forming the course for certain competitive skiing events.
3. moguls(used with a sing. or pl. verb) A skiing event held on such a course.

[Alteration (probably influenced by mogul) of mid-20th century American skiers' jargon mugel, from Bavarian dialectal (Austria) Mugl, hillock; perhaps akin to Old English mūga, mow, haystack; see mow1.]

mo·gul 2

 (mō′gəl, mō-gŭl′)
n.
1. A very rich or powerful person; a magnate.
2. Mogul Variant of Mughal.

[Urdu muġal, muġul, Mughal; see Mughal.]

Mogul

(ˈməʊɡʌl; məʊˈɡʌl)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a member of the Muslim dynasty of Indian emperors established by Baber in 1526. See Great Mogul
2. (Islam) a Muslim Indian, Mongol, or Mongolian
3. (Peoples) a Muslim Indian, Mongol, or Mongolian
adj
(Historical Terms) of or relating to the Moguls or their empire
[C16: from Persian mughul Mongol]

mogul

(ˈməʊɡʌl; məʊˈɡʌl)
n
1. an important or powerful person
2. (Railways) a type of steam locomotive with a wheel arrangement of two leading wheels, six driving wheels, and no trailing wheels
[C18: from Mogul]

mogul

(ˈməʊɡəl)
n
(Skiing) a mound of hard snow on a ski slope
[C20: perhaps from South German dialect Mugl]

mo•gul

(ˈmoʊ gəl)

n.
a bump or mound of hard snow on a ski slope.
[1960–65; < dial. German; compare Austrian Mugel small hill]
mo′guled, adj.

Mo•gul

(ˈmoʊ gəl, -gʌl, moʊˈgʌl)

n.
1. a member of the dynasty of Muslim rulers that dominated N India and parts of the Deccan from the 16th to the early 18th centuries.
2. (l.c.) a powerful or influential person: a mogul of the movie industry.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to the Moguls or their empire.
[1580–90; < Persian mughul Mongol]

mogul

- A small mound of snow on a ski course, from Old Norse mugl, "little heap."
See also related terms for heap.

mogul

Snow mound usually formed by many skiers turning in the same place.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mogul - a bump on a ski slopemogul - a bump on a ski slope    
excrescence, extrusion, gibbosity, gibbousness, hump, jut, bulge, protrusion, protuberance, swelling, bump, prominence - something that bulges out or is protuberant or projects from its surroundings; "the gun in his pocket made an obvious bulge"; "the hump of a camel"; "he stood on the rocky prominence"; "the occipital protuberance was well developed"; "the bony excrescence between its horns"
2.mogul - a member of the Muslim dynasty that ruled India until 1857Mogul - a member of the Muslim dynasty that ruled India until 1857
ruler, swayer - a person who rules or commands; "swayer of the universe"
3.mogul - a very wealthy or powerful businessmanmogul - a very wealthy or powerful businessman; "an oil baron"
businessman, man of affairs - a person engaged in commercial or industrial business (especially an owner or executive)
oil tycoon - a powerful person in the oil business

mogul

noun tycoon, lord, baron, notable, magnate, big gun (informal), big shot (informal), personage, nob (slang, chiefly Brit.), potentate, big wheel (slang), big cheese (slang, old-fashioned), big noise (informal), big hitter (informal), heavy hitter (informal), nabob (informal), bashaw, V.I.P. an international media mogul
Translations
قُطْب من أقْطاب المال
magnát
=-mogulmogul
mogulipohatta
magnatmoghol
mogul
magnats
kralıpatron

mogul

[ˈməʊgəl] N
1. (Hist) → mo(n)gol(a) m/f
the Great Mogulel Gran Mogol
2. (fig) → magnate m
film mogulmagnate m de la cinematografía

mogul

[ˈməʊgʌl] n
(= powerful man) → nabab m
bosse f

mogul

1
n
(lit, fig)Mogul m
(Hist) Mogul emperorMogulkaiser m; Mogul empireMogulreich nt; Mogul invasionInvasion fdurch die Moguln; Mogul citymogulische Stadt

mogul

2
n (Ski) → Buckel m

mogul

[ˈməʊgl] n
a. (fig) → magnate m, pezzo grosso
b. (Skiing) → cunetta

mogul

(ˈməugl) noun
a very rich person who has great power or influence in a particular industry or activity. a movie mogul; a media mogul.
References in classic literature ?
There now's the old Mogul, soliloquized Stubb by the try-works, he's been twigging it; and there goes Starbuck from the same, and both with faces which I should say might be somewhere within nine fathoms long.
The bulletin-boarder referred to was Sir Ossaise of Surluse, a brave knight, and of considerable celebrity on account of his having tried conclusions in a tournament once, with no less a Mogul that Sir Gaheris himself -- although not successfully.
She got a berth as second chambermaid on a Cincinnati boat in the New Orleans trade, the Grand Mogul.
When the boat touched the levee at New Orleans she bade good-by to her comrades on the Grand Mogul and moved her kit ashore.
I nodded; she treated me like the great Mogul; so I became the great Mogul as far as she was concerned.
She had a vivid imagination; she had, besides, read the Arabian Nights and Guthrie's Geography; and it is a fact that while she was dressing for dinner, and after she had asked Amelia whether her brother was very rich, she had built for herself a most magnificent castle in the air, of which she was mistress, with a husband somewhere in the background (she had not seen him as yet, and his figure would not therefore be very distinct); she had arrayed herself in an infinity of shawls, turbans, and diamond necklaces, and had mounted upon an elephant to the sound of the march in Bluebeard, in order to pay a visit of ceremony to the Grand Mogul.
to the toll- keeper; but then he awoke out of a dream about picking a lock in the stomach of the Great Mogul, and even when he did wake, mixed up the turnpike man with his mother-in-law who had been dead twenty years.
The lame foreigner with the stick represented that you sent him; but he could represent (as far as that goes) that the Great Mogul sent him.
How Mr Chuckster, entranced by this monstrous fact, stood for some time rooted to the earth, protesting within himself that Kit was the Prince of felonious characters, and very Emperor or Great Mogul of Snobs, and how he clearly traced this revolting circumstance back to that old villany of the shilling, are matters foreign to our purpose; which is to track the rolling wheels, and bear the travellers company on their cold, bleak journey.
And he said we were in luck, too; said we might attend receptions for forty thousand years to come, and not have a chance to see a brace of such grand moguls as Moses and Esau.
One age followed another until the first years of the eighteenth Christian century saw the reign of Aurungzebe, Emperor of the Moguls.
For every course purchased, Mogul distributes the Courses to communities in need for free through various partners such as JPMorgan, Dress for Success, Wharton Women in Business, and others.