moil


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moil

 (moil)
intr.v. moiled, moil·ing, moils
1. To work hard; toil: men who moil in mines.
2. To churn about continuously: clouds moiling in the wind.
n.
1. Hard work; toil.
2. Confusion; turmoil: "the dogs shooting past her in a moil of fur and flashing feet" (T.C. Boyle).

[Middle English mollen, to soften by wetting, from Old French moillier, from Vulgar Latin *molliāre, from Latin mollia (pānis), the soft part (of bread), from neuter pl. of mollis, soft; see mel- in Indo-European roots.]

moil′er n.

moil

(mɔɪl)
vb
1. to moisten or soil or become moist, soiled, etc
2. (intr) to toil or drudge (esp in the phrase toil and moil)
n
3. toil; drudgery
4. confusion; turmoil
[C14 (to moisten; later: to work hard in unpleasantly wet conditions) from Old French moillier, ultimately from Latin mollis soft]
ˈmoiler n

moil

(mɔɪl)

v.i.
1. to work hard; drudge.
2. to whirl or eddy.
v.t.
3. Archaic. to wet or smudge.
n.
[1350–1400; Middle English moillen to make or get wet and muddy < Middle French moillier < Vulgar Latin *molliāre, derivative of Latin mollis soft]
moil′er, n.

moil


Past participle: moiled
Gerund: moiling

Imperative
moil
moil
Present
I moil
you moil
he/she/it moils
we moil
you moil
they moil
Preterite
I moiled
you moiled
he/she/it moiled
we moiled
you moiled
they moiled
Present Continuous
I am moiling
you are moiling
he/she/it is moiling
we are moiling
you are moiling
they are moiling
Present Perfect
I have moiled
you have moiled
he/she/it has moiled
we have moiled
you have moiled
they have moiled
Past Continuous
I was moiling
you were moiling
he/she/it was moiling
we were moiling
you were moiling
they were moiling
Past Perfect
I had moiled
you had moiled
he/she/it had moiled
we had moiled
you had moiled
they had moiled
Future
I will moil
you will moil
he/she/it will moil
we will moil
you will moil
they will moil
Future Perfect
I will have moiled
you will have moiled
he/she/it will have moiled
we will have moiled
you will have moiled
they will have moiled
Future Continuous
I will be moiling
you will be moiling
he/she/it will be moiling
we will be moiling
you will be moiling
they will be moiling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been moiling
you have been moiling
he/she/it has been moiling
we have been moiling
you have been moiling
they have been moiling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been moiling
you will have been moiling
he/she/it will have been moiling
we will have been moiling
you will have been moiling
they will have been moiling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been moiling
you had been moiling
he/she/it had been moiling
we had been moiling
you had been moiling
they had been moiling
Conditional
I would moil
you would moil
he/she/it would moil
we would moil
you would moil
they would moil
Past Conditional
I would have moiled
you would have moiled
he/she/it would have moiled
we would have moiled
you would have moiled
they would have moiled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.moil - work hardmoil - work hard; "She was digging away at her math homework"; "Lexicographers drudge all day long"
do work, work - be employed; "Is your husband working again?"; "My wife never worked"; "Do you want to work after the age of 60?"; "She never did any work because she inherited a lot of money"; "She works as a waitress to put herself through college"
2.moil - be agitatedmoil - be agitated; "the sea was churning in the storm"
seethe, roll - boil vigorously; "The liquid was seething"; "The water rolled"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
3.moil - moisten or soilmoil - moisten or soil; "Her tears moiled the letter"
smear - stain by smearing or daubing with a dirty substance

moil

verb
To exert one's mental or physical powers, usually under difficulty and to the point of exhaustion:
noun
Physical exertion that is usually difficult and exhausting:
Informal: sweat.
Chiefly British: fag.
Idiom: sweat of one's brow.
References in classic literature ?
I shall have to toil and moil all my days, with only little bits of fun now and then, and get old and ugly and sour, because I'm poor and can't enjoy my life as other girls do.
Why should he toil and moil, and be at so much trouble to pick himself up out of the mud, when, in a little while hence, the strong arm of his Uncle will raise and support him?
With such steel, One need fear nothing in the moil of life.