mokopuna

mokopuna

(ˌməʊkəʊˈpuːnə)
n
NZ a grandchild or young person
[Māori]
References in periodicals archive ?
She leaves behind her three children and five mokopuna whom she adored.
Our mokopuna (grandchildren) still cannot hear, see, feel, taste, and know that their culture, language, and ways of being are valued and appreciated by all early childhood centres in Aotearoa/New Zealand, a fact evidenced in the research of Clark and Grey (2010), ERO (2008, 2010), and others.
te Aroha i tuku iho ai hei oranga, ma nga mokopuna, na reira e Pa, kei
When we arrived (at the prearranged time) he had popped out to drop his mokopuna [grandchild] somewhere locally.
Moana Jackson (4) agrees as far as the employment of the Maori concept of whakapapa accords mokopuna (descendents) of both Pakeha and Maori ancestors this double heritage, but differs as to the politics to be pursued.
Whereas the poupou peer in from another world remotely ancestral, familiar persons in the photographs look out at their mokopuna descendants and their children.
Our tupuna made the sacrifice and we must ensure our future mokopuna, whanau, hapu and iwi receive the best health care available in Aotearoa.
In particular she feared her mokopuna (grandchild) might attempt suicide, as his grandfather was his significant male role model, and now they were unable to engage in the activities that they used to do together.
The parts of their heritage which might be English, Chinese or Samoan is never denied, but in Maori terms they are simply mokopuna because it is impossible to have only a "part grandchild".
While Durie dedicates Whaiora to his mokopuna, and to future generations, the book also serves to recognise and respect the efforts of all those who have worked quietly for Maori development.