mole rat


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mole rat

 (mōl)
n.
1. Any of several furry burrowing rodents of the genus Spalax and related genera in the family Spalacidae, having short limbs and reduced eyes and found in eastern Europe, central Asia, the Middle East, and Africa.
2. Any of several burrowing rodents of the family Bathyergidae, having short limbs and reduced eyes and found in sub-Saharan Africa.

mole rat

n
1. (Animals) any burrowing molelike African rodent of the family Bathyergidae
2. (Animals) any similar rodent, esp any member of the genus Spalax, of Asia and North Africa: family Spalacidae
3. (Animals) the bandicoot rat. See bandicoot2
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mole rat - African rodent resembling a mole in habits and appearancemole rat - African rodent resembling a mole in habits and appearance
gnawer, rodent - relatively small placental mammals having a single pair of constantly growing incisor teeth specialized for gnawing
2.mole rat - furry short-limbed tailless rodent resembling a true mole in habits and appearance; of eastern Europe and Middle East
gnawer, rodent - relatively small placental mammals having a single pair of constantly growing incisor teeth specialized for gnawing
genus Spalax, Spalax - type genus of the Spalacidae
3.mole rat - burrowing scaly-tailed rat of India and Ceylon
rat - any of various long-tailed rodents similar to but larger than a mouse
genus Nesokia, Nesokia - bandicoot rats
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike iPSCs from other animal species, tumors did not form when mole rat iPSCs were inserted into the testes of mice with extremely weak immune systems.
He goes on to describe certain animals that never get cancer, including the naked mole rat, the blind mole rat, and a mouse discovered in 1999 that has an autosomal dominant mutation rendering it impervious to cancer.
Yuksel & Gulkac (1990) reviewed data on blind mole rat karyotypes from Balkan Peninsula, Asia Minor and the Caucasus, and proposed a phylogenetic dendrogram.
These include two primates (Himalayan rhesus monkey, hanuman grey langur); eight (8) Chiropetra (Indian false vampire bat, fulvous fruit bat, Himalayan pipistrelle, lesser horseshoe bat, common bent-wing bat, dark whiskered bat, Pallas's tube-nosed bat, Torresian tube-nosed bat or northern tube-nosed bat, Gilgit tube-nosed bat, and horseshoe bat); seven (7) carnivores (golden jackal, common leopard, Asiatic black bear, jungle cat, stoat or ermine, Himalayan palm civit and yellow-throated martin); and 12 rodents (Himalayan field mouse, house mouse, roof rat or house rat, Eurasian pygmy shrew, Turkestan rat, Indian mole rat, short-tailed mole rat, small Kashmir flying squirrel, Royle's high mountain vole; and one artiodactyle (barking deer) species.
Activity pattern and rhythm in the subterranean mole rat superspecies Spalax ehrenbergi.
The giant, massive-nosed elephant seal that eats penguins and the fanged white mole rat that lives 30 years and is resistant to cancer certainly fall into that less-thanbeautiful category.
One species of mole rat has no external opening for eyes, but they have small eyes hidden beneath their skin.
Seluanov has the second-largest naked mole rat colony in the world.
Beneath them are the sapient mole rat race; whether the mole rats are servants, slaves, or subordinate neighbors is a judgment call.
In fact, when naked mole rat cells are induced to form a tumor, the rodents stop the threat almost immediately.
Children will certainly enjoy this entertaining book but the real value has to be in all the information about many creatures ranging from the naked mole rat, with teeth outside its mouth to the emperor scorpion with armour which could survive a nuclear blast.
The naked mole rat, a hairless rodent that lives in ant-like colonies underground, appears to enjoy complete protection against the disease, despite its unusually long 30-year lifespan.